Jane Skrypnek

The B.C. Securities Commission is asking ICBC not to renew the driver’s license of a man who owes $7.6-million in fraud fines. (Stock photo)

B.C. man owing $7.6M in fraud fines could have driver’s licence pulled: Securities commission

BCSC gained new licence-blocking power back in March 2021

The B.C. Securities Commission is asking ICBC not to renew the driver’s license of a man who owes $7.6-million in fraud fines. (Stock photo)
Honey bees flit in and out of their colony atop an apartment building in Vancouver’s West End. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

VIDEO: Vancouver rooftops home to a new breed of honey bee: one made to survive

Ensure Hive Future breeding queen bees to be resistant to deadly mites

Honey bees flit in and out of their colony atop an apartment building in Vancouver’s West End. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
Advocates for decriminalization and safe supply of drugs stood outside Nelson’s city hall on April 14th. In the month of April, 161 British Columbians died from the toxic drug supply, according to the BC Coroners Service. (Bill Metcalfe/News Staff)

B.C. sees 161 people die to toxic drug crisis in April, amid calls for safer supply

April death rates highest in Northern Health and Vancouver Coastal Health

Advocates for decriminalization and safe supply of drugs stood outside Nelson’s city hall on April 14th. In the month of April, 161 British Columbians died from the toxic drug supply, according to the BC Coroners Service. (Bill Metcalfe/News Staff)
A wildfire burns in the mountains north of Lytton on July 1, 2021. According to a survey 2022 survey by BCAA, most British Columbians fear more extreme weather events. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

85% of British Columbians fear another extreme weather event, but few are prepared: survey

Almost half of survey respondents taking “wait-and-see” approach, BCAA found

A wildfire burns in the mountains north of Lytton on July 1, 2021. According to a survey 2022 survey by BCAA, most British Columbians fear more extreme weather events. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)
A 2019 pilot program in Vancouver found take-home fentanyl tests have the potential to increase safer consumption of drugs. (Credit: Amy Romer/BC Centre on Substance Use)

Take-home fentanyl tests could increase safer drug consumption in B.C.: study

2019 Vancouver study found 30% of participants made safer choices after using take-home test

A 2019 pilot program in Vancouver found take-home fentanyl tests have the potential to increase safer consumption of drugs. (Credit: Amy Romer/BC Centre on Substance Use)
A motorist watches from a pullout on the Trans-Canada Highway as a wildfire burns on the side of a mountain in Lytton, B.C., July 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. piloting fire dashboard to help identify communities most at-risk of blazes

Online dashboard will launch in Coquitlam, Surrey, and Port Alberni in July

A motorist watches from a pullout on the Trans-Canada Highway as a wildfire burns on the side of a mountain in Lytton, B.C., July 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Northwest B.C. communities were without Telus services June 7 due to a damaged cable. (Google Maps)

UPDATE: Leave it to beaver

A beaver felled the tree that caused a service outage in B.C.’s northwest June 7

Northwest B.C. communities were without Telus services June 7 due to a damaged cable. (Google Maps)
A B.C. high school teacher has been banned from practising in the province for life for having a sexual relationship with a student. (Credit: Pixabay)

B.C. high school teacher banned for life for sexual relationship with student

Teacher pleaded guilty to sexual exploitation in 2019

A B.C. high school teacher has been banned from practising in the province for life for having a sexual relationship with a student. (Credit: Pixabay)
Many cities across B.C. recorded the hottest days of their histories during the ‘heat dome’ heatwave that blanketed much of the Pacific Northwest at the end June, 2021. (Black Press Media file photo)

B.C. launches heat alert system following 2021’s deadly heat dome

System to have 2 levels: warning and extreme heat emergencies

Many cities across B.C. recorded the hottest days of their histories during the ‘heat dome’ heatwave that blanketed much of the Pacific Northwest at the end June, 2021. (Black Press Media file photo)
The BC Schizophrenia Society supported more than 1,000 families touched by serious mental illness in 2021. (BC Schizophrenia Society/Facebook)

BC Schizophrenia Society hopes to reach thousands touched by serious mental illness

Non-profit offers resources, peer and group support for those with illness and their loved ones

The BC Schizophrenia Society supported more than 1,000 families touched by serious mental illness in 2021. (BC Schizophrenia Society/Facebook)
B.C. chief coroner Lisa Lapointe released a report Tuesday (June 7) reviewing heat-related deaths in B.C. in summer 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Review into B.C.’s 2021 heat dome deaths finds 93% didn’t have air conditioning

Cooling requirements in new builds among recommendations by BC Coroners Service’s report

B.C. chief coroner Lisa Lapointe released a report Tuesday (June 7) reviewing heat-related deaths in B.C. in summer 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
A classroom in Scarborough, Ont., on September 14, 2020. A North Vancouver School District teacher was suspended for five days in May 2022 for taking inappropriate actions against his elementary school students. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

B.C. elementary school teacher suspended for cracking backs, pinching trapeziuses

Students called the one moved the ‘back-breaker,’ and several said it was painful

A classroom in Scarborough, Ont., on September 14, 2020. A North Vancouver School District teacher was suspended for five days in May 2022 for taking inappropriate actions against his elementary school students. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
A man pauses at a coffin after carrying it during a memorial march to remember victims of overdose deaths in Vancouver on August 15, 2020. Advocates say Health Canada’s announcement to decriminalize personal possession of 2.5 grams will do little to save people’s lives. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

For decriminalization to save lives, users need to be allowed to carry more drugs: B.C. advocates

Health Canada nearly halved requested personal possession amount in approval May 31

A man pauses at a coffin after carrying it during a memorial march to remember victims of overdose deaths in Vancouver on August 15, 2020. Advocates say Health Canada’s announcement to decriminalize personal possession of 2.5 grams will do little to save people’s lives. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
The Coastal GasLink pipeline near Parsnip River crossing in northern B.C., February 2022. The company is being sued by a former chef who worked at one of its remote camps. (Coastal GasLink photo)

Former chef of remote Coastal GasLink camp sues for sexual battery, unsanitary workplace

Woman says nothing was done after she was groped against her consent

The Coastal GasLink pipeline near Parsnip River crossing in northern B.C., February 2022. The company is being sued by a former chef who worked at one of its remote camps. (Coastal GasLink photo)
Dean Anderson holds up a sign before a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, on February 21, 2017. Beginning Jan. 31 2023, adults in B.C. will be allowed to carry up to 2.5 grams of drugs for personal use, Health Canada announced May 31, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. approved to decriminalize possession of small amounts of street drugs as deaths soar

Personal possession of up to 2.5 grams to be allowed for three years beginning Jan. 31, 2023

Dean Anderson holds up a sign before a march on the first National Day of Action to draw attention to the opioid overdose epidemic, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, on February 21, 2017. Beginning Jan. 31 2023, adults in B.C. will be allowed to carry up to 2.5 grams of drugs for personal use, Health Canada announced May 31, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
A University of British Columbia researcher says it’s unclear what the cause of the majority of B.C.’s deaths during 18-months of the pandemic is. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. saw more deaths than expected over 18 months, but research can’t pinpoint why

Only 22 per cent of excess deaths during research period are directly attributed to COVID-19

A University of British Columbia researcher says it’s unclear what the cause of the majority of B.C.’s deaths during 18-months of the pandemic is. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Recent UBC graduate Aiyana Twigg won the 2022 Lieutenant Governor’s medal for inclusion, democracy and reconciliation. (Courtesy of Aiyana Twigg)

UBC student wins Lieutenant-Governor medal for work on Indigenous language revitalization

Aiyana Twigg helps under-resourced communities to develop their own dictionaries, among other things

Recent UBC graduate Aiyana Twigg won the 2022 Lieutenant Governor’s medal for inclusion, democracy and reconciliation. (Courtesy of Aiyana Twigg)
Bioform’s Rami Younes (right) and Jordan MacKenzie (left) showing a sheet of the bioplastic. (Credit: Kai Jacobson/UBC Applied Science)

UBC scientists aim to put plastic in the past with 2 new inventions

Biodegradable product could replace plastic, unique coating could extend its life

Bioform’s Rami Younes (right) and Jordan MacKenzie (left) showing a sheet of the bioplastic. (Credit: Kai Jacobson/UBC Applied Science)
Bear viewing guide and expert Ellie Lamb is concerned B.C. conservation officers are euthanizing too many bears, but the conservation service says it’s always a last resort. (Submitted: Tracy Duncan)

BC Conservation needs oversight on bear euthanizations, expert argues

More than 600 bears killed in B.C. in 2021

Bear viewing guide and expert Ellie Lamb is concerned B.C. conservation officers are euthanizing too many bears, but the conservation service says it’s always a last resort. (Submitted: Tracy Duncan)
A rottweiler puppy waits to be examined by a veterinarian during a free animal health care clinic for the pets of low or no income residents, in Abbotsford in 2019. A May 2022 B.C. small claims decision involving a rottweiler demonstrates the complexity of shared pet custody. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Dog ownership split between multiple exes makes for tricky B.C. custody case

B.C. woman ordered to return dog to ex, ex’s old partner despite claim it was gifted to her verbally

A rottweiler puppy waits to be examined by a veterinarian during a free animal health care clinic for the pets of low or no income residents, in Abbotsford in 2019. A May 2022 B.C. small claims decision involving a rottweiler demonstrates the complexity of shared pet custody. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck