The nest and pole top are cut free from a fire damaged structure and lowered by crane to the ground. Then the nest was returned to the top of the replacement transmission structure. (BC Hydro photo)

The nest and pole top are cut free from a fire damaged structure and lowered by crane to the ground. Then the nest was returned to the top of the replacement transmission structure. (BC Hydro photo)

Eagle’s nest receives reno after Chase grass fire

BC Hydro used to dealing with osprey nests, not so much with bald eagles

A nesting bald eagle has received something of a home renovation courtesy of BC Hydro crews responding to damages from a recent grass fire near Chase.

The utility provider says six of its hydro poles were damaged in the fire that began at the end of March and was under control as of April 1.

“As part of emergency response efforts to restore power, a crew of PLTs (power line technicians) and environmental field staff had to relocate a large nest with a single bald eagle egg that was found on top of a damaged wooden transmission tower,” says BC Hydro.

The egg was placed in a clean, straw=filled pale by individuals using scent-free surgical gloves, then covered and placed in a temperature-controlled environment as the nest was being removed. The removal process involved cutting the nest and pole top free from the damaged structure, lowering them to the ground by crane and then placing the nest on top of the replacement structure.

BC Hydro said after the work was complete, the mother bird was seen showing interest in the nest, eventually returning to it and the egg the following morning.

As eagles typically nest in trees, this was an unusual nest relocation for BC Hydro.

“Working with osprey isn’t anything new for our crews,” says BC Hydro, which had to move two Salmon Arm osprey nests in 2018. “They have an extensive record of nest moves guided by species-specific environment best management practices and nest mitigation procedures. Our crews don’t run into bald eagles as often.”

Read more: Salmon Arm osprey nests linked to power outages moved

Read more: New feathered residents move to Squilax

Read more: VIDEO: Kestrel chicks released into wild bring a happy end to wildfire season


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The nest and pole top are cut free from a fire damaged structure and lowered by crane to the ground. Then the nest was returned to the top of the replacement transmission structure. (BC Hydro photo)

The nest and pole top are cut free from a fire damaged structure and lowered by crane to the ground. Then the nest was returned to the top of the replacement transmission structure. (BC Hydro photo)

Eagle’s nest receives reno after Chase grass fire