In 1909, water was diverted from Eneas Creek in Summerland to irrigate the Jones Flat area of the community. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

In 1909, water was diverted from Eneas Creek in Summerland to irrigate the Jones Flat area of the community. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Flumes once provided irrigation water to Summerland

Historic flumes can still be seen in parts of the community today

In 1909, irrigation flumes provided water to the community of Summerland.

The flume in the Jones Flat area diverted water from Aeneas Creek to provide irrigation to local orchards. Today, some of the historic flumes can still be seen in parts of the community.

Summerland’s reservoirs have a capacity of 14,136 megalitres. The community’s water supply was expanded in 2008 when the size of Thirsk Lake was roughly doubled. The lake, to the west of Summerland, now has a capacity of 6,474 megalitres, up from 3,391 megalitres.

Summerland’s water treatment plant was completed in 2007 and has the capacity to handle up to 75 megalitres of water a day. During the summer months, when irrigation demand is at its highest, the community can reach 112 megalitres of water a day.

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Some of Summerland’s historic flumes can be seen today, near the water treatment plant and in other parts of the community. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

Some of Summerland’s historic flumes can be seen today, near the water treatment plant and in other parts of the community. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)