Ray Brosseuk holds up a pile of gold nuggets from his Yukon mine.

Get your gold to support local charity

Ray Brosseuk selling gold nuggets in collaboration with local jeweller Suzanne Spisani. Proceeds go towards charity Partners for Others.

“Where do you get the money to fund your charity?

It’s a question many people ask Ray Brosseuk, who, along with his wife Jackie, ships dozens of containers full of clothes and other products to Africa every year through their organization Partner for Others.

The answer is by mining for gold in the Yukon every summer. “Mining is what has been supporting our charity work since we’ve been doing it in 1995,” said Ray Brosseuk.

Another question he gets asked often is, “How can I help?”

That answer is a little trickier, since Partners For Others isn’t a registered charity and Brosseuk funds it all himself. “When I first felt that I wanted to do something in this world to make a difference for people who are less fortunate, why would I have such a desire to do that and then turn around and expect the community or people around me to support my feelings.”

This Christmas season he is giving Revelstokians a direct opportunity to support the charity by selling some of his gold nuggets in town through jeweller Suzanne Spisani of Spisani Design jewellery store downtown.

The gold nuggets come from Brosseuk’s mining claim in the Yukon Territory. Every summer he and his family spend three months in the north mining for gold and the operation is successful enough to fund Partners For Others.

He uses a machine he developed himself to sift through gravel and sort out the gold from the debris. He said his operation can process 20 dump truck loads of gravel every hour.

About 70 per cent of the gold is fine powder that he melts down and pours into bars. The rest are gold nuggets that he sells to jewellers up and down the west coast, from the Yukon to California.

“This is gold that I just dug right out of the ground,” Brosseuk said. “It’s natural, it’s the way it comes out of the creek.”

Brosseuk said the gold he mines is 94 per cent pure – apprximately 22 carat, which is about as good as it gets. Spisani backed up his claim.

“It’s some of the best nuggets I’ve ever seen,” she said.

She will be selling the nuggets as pendants, earrings or as raw pieces. “I’m thrilled to be able to support a good cause,” Spisani said.

They will range in price from $60 for the smaller pieces to $3,000 for the biggest ones, said Brosseuk. A portion of the proceeds will go to the charity; the rest will pay for Brosseuk’s operations.

The sale begins this Friday, Nov. 25, during Moonlight Madness. The pieces will be on display at Spisani Design and available for sale until Christmas.

Just Posted

Kelowna classroom where child allegedly overdosed re-opens after cleaning

An 8-year-old was unresponsive and unable to walk after ingesting an unknown substance at school.

Revelstoke’s Dam Survivors bring home bronze

The dragon boat team finished up their season with a medal

Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past for Sept. 12

120 Years Ago: Revelstoke Herald, Sept. 13, 1899 The memorial stone for… Continue reading

Revelstoke Community Calendar for Sept. 12

Bear Aware Affair Sept. 22, 4 p.m. Alley beside The Regent A… Continue reading

Growls and Hugs for Sept. 12

Someone or something got your hackles up? Or maybe someone made you… Continue reading

VIDEO: Vancouver Island mayor details emergency response after fatal bus crash

Sharie Minions says she is ‘appalled’ by condition of road where bus crashed

Federal party leaders address gun violence after weekend shooting near Toronto

One teen was killed and five people injured in the shooting

Video: Rain doesn’t deter Terry Fox runners in Salmon Arm

Dozens showed up to continue the Canadian icon’s marathon of hope.

Conservatives promise tax cut that they say will address Liberal increases

Scheer says the cut would apply to the lowest income bracket

B.C. VIEWS: Cutting wood waste produces some bleeding

Value-added industry slowly grows as big sawmills close

Fewer trees, higher costs blamed for devastating downturn in B.C. forestry

Some say the high cost of logs is the major cause of the industry’s decline in B.C.

Federal food safety watchdog says batch of baby formula recalled

The agency says it’s conducting a food safety investigation

Road block was costly legal battle for Summerland

Resolving Garnet Valley dispute took six years

Most Read