Bourne Bros. General Store building at their original location on the road to the CPR station in the 1890s. (Revelstoke Museum and Archives photo 83)
Bourne Bros. General Store building at their original location on the road to the CPR station, circa 1890s. (Revelstoke Museum and Archives photo 83)

Bourne Bros. General Store building at their original location on the road to the CPR station in the 1890s. (Revelstoke Museum and Archives photo 83) Bourne Bros. General Store building at their original location on the road to the CPR station, circa 1890s. (Revelstoke Museum and Archives photo 83)

Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past for April 15

Local history as recorded by the newspaper of the day

130 years ago: Kootenay Star, April 18, 1891

The steamer SS Lytton was put into shape for the new season, and was painted inside and out. The cabins were finished in white, gold, pale blue, and pink. The ship was preparing for its first trip down the river on April 18, and every berth was engaged for the trip.

120 years ago: Revelstoke Herald, April 17, 1901

Bourne Bros. General Store were removing their store buildings from the street near the CPR station to the corner of Mackenzie Avenue and First Street. The home occupied by. H.J. Bourne was moved in between Fifth and Sixth Street on Mackenzie Avenue to make way for the business buildings.

100 years ago: Revelstoke Review, April 14, 1921

By-Law No. 294, providing for shop regulation was passed by City Council. The by-law required merchants to close their places of business at 9 p.m. on Saturdays, and at 1 p.m. on Wednesdays, which was a weekly half-holiday.

90 years ago: Revelstoke Review, April 17, 1931

A huge rock slide came down at Redgrave, 67 miles east of Revelstoke, blocking the main line of the CPR for four days. The work of clearing the slide involved the use of steam shovels, ditchers, and large quantities of powder. Robert Richards died during the clearing operation, when a ditcher toppled over, striking and killing him.

80 years ago: Revelstoke Review, April 17, 1941

Students at Revelstoke High School had bought almost $500 worth of War Savings Certificates. A large painting by Principal M.W. Abbott, hung in the auditorium to inspire the students. The painting showed German planes flying over the strait of Dover, with anti-aircraft guns directed at the planes. Each gun represented a class in the school, and when War Savings Stamps equal in number to the class enrollment was purchased, it was considered equivalent to one German plane being shot down. Grade 9A had bought $160 worth of certificates, accounting for 24 planes.

70 years ago: Revelstoke Review, April 12, 1951

Close to one half million dollars was allocated for highway upgrades in the Revelstoke district, including reconstruction of bridges on the West road. There was discussion about the future of the Big Bend Highway, as the possibility of a dam being built at Mica Creek was already under consideration. A new route through Rogers Pass was being considered.

60 years ago: Revelstoke Review, April 13, 1961

Charlene Norberg of Revelstoke was chosen Miss Sweetheart of 1961 at the B.C. Teen Town convention in Richmond, B.C. Ten members of Revelstoke’s Teen Town club attended the convention.

50 years ago: Revelstoke Review, April 15, 1971

Several Highland dancers from Revelstoke, all pupils of Peggy Norberg, took part in the Yale Cariboo Musical Festival held in Kamloops. Linda Konas was awarded the trophy for the highest mark obtained in four classes of dancing. The competition included 164 entrants from throughout the region, including 18 dancers from Revelstoke, several of whom placed in the top five.

40 years ago: Revelstoke Review, April 15, 1981

The Rocky Mountain Rangers cadets in Revelstoke had been looking for a new home since the Armoury was closed in July of 1980. The armoury, or drill hall, had been built in 1902 for the Rocky Mountain Rangers, which was then an adult militia. It was used for recruiting and training during World War I. The building was up for sale. It is the current home of Trans-Canada Fitness.

20 years ago: Revelstoke Review, April 11, 2001

Ruby Nobbs, Revelstoke’s local historian, passed away on April 4, 1991 at the age of 94. Ruby was a charter member of the Revelstoke Museum and Archives Association, and was instrumental in the formation of the museum. She also served for years on the Revelstoke Heritage Commission, and was a director of the BC Heritage Society. She wrote two books on Revelstoke history, both published she was 91. She was also the proprietor of Alpine Lanes Bowling Alley for many years.


 

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Local History