Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past for Dec. 26

Revelstoke Fire Brigade No.2 fire hall on Second Street East. (Revelstoke Museum & Archives photo 277)

Cathy English

Revelstoke Museum & Archives

120 years ago: Revelstoke Herald, Dec. 23, 1899

The contract for the fire hall for Fire Brigade #2 was awarded to W.A. Nettle for $1580 with an additional $121 for the chimney. The hall was built on Second Street East, where the Planning Department of City Hall is now located. The city also formally changed the names of John, James, and George Street in the Farwell townsite to First, Second, and Third Street.

110 years ago: Mail-Herald, Dec. 22, 1909

A number of carpenters employed on the new government traffic bridge over the Columbia River here, went on strike for higher wages. Contractors Gillette and Macdonald had hired several workmen skilled in bridge framing at $4 per day, and the other workmen demanded the same wage. The contractors gave in to their demands, with the exception of one man, who was abusive to his employers. The contractors also had to deal with ice on the river carrying away some of their pilings.

100 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Dec. 25, 1919

A meeting of the Public Inquiries Commission of B.C. was scheduled for January 6th to gauge public interest in laws relating to Mothers’ Pensions, Maternity Insurance, Health Insurance, and Public Health Nursing. Many of these services were in force in other countries. Members of fraternal organizations, benefit societies, municipalities and other organizations were encouraged to present their views on the subject. There was no public welfare in place at that time.

90 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Dec. 24, 1929

The King Edward Hotel published their New Year’s Dinner menu, which included lobster with mayonnaise dressing, raised shoulder of Lamb a la Jardiniere, Crab and Mushroom Vol au Vent, stuffed young turkey with cranberry sauce, tenderloin of beef with black currant jelly, corn a la southern, deep green apple pie, home-made hot mince pie, steamed Old English fruit pudding and much more. Cost for dinner was $2 for adults and $1 for children.

80 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Dec. 29, 1939

To Revelstoke belongs the honor of having one of the first Canadian fliers to be attached to the Royal Air Force in England. This is Russell Donaldson, son of Mrs. A.P. McIntosh, of this city. Donaldson went to England and joined the Royal Air Force two years previously. Malcolm McFadyen and Howard C. Cotterell of Revelstoke had also joined the RAF and were enroute overseas.

70 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Dec. 29, 1949

An editorial claimed that the International Ski Tournament, scheduled for January 27 and 28, 1950, would be the biggest thing in skiing to come to Western Canada since the world-famous meets of more than a quarter century previously. The entire Norwegian Ski-jumping team of seven men was scheduled to appear. The local club had already spent more than $10,000 on upgrades to the ski jump, and club members had built a new judges’ stand and a new coffee bar.

60 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Dec. 24, 1959

Fire Chief Sam Needham spoke to council regarding the new fire truck that had been recently purchased. The supplier had suggested that a member of the local brigade go east to pick up the truck and drive it back to Revelstoke in order to identify any possible defects in the truck. The trip would also make the driver more familiar with the vehicle. City Council agreed to this when it was made clear that the supplier would make the necessary compensation for the cost of sending the driver to pick up the truck.


 

@JDoll_Revy
jocelyn.doll@revelstokereview.com

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