Arnfinn Bergmann jumping at Revelstoke in 1950. (Earle Dickey/Revelstoke Museum & Archives 1365 photo)

Arnfinn Bergmann jumping at Revelstoke in 1950. (Earle Dickey/Revelstoke Museum & Archives 1365 photo)

Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past for Feb. 13

120 years ago: Revelstoke Herald, Feb. 13, 1900

Ten Revelstoke men left for service with the Strathcona’s Horse regiment in the Boer War in South Africa. The local militia gave an entertainment in their honour, and then gave them a hearty send off at the station. One of the men who served was Thomas Lewis, who later lost his life in World War I.

110 years ago: Mail-Herald, Feb. 12, 1910

The city finances were audited by Messrs. Stein & Co., Chartered Accountants of Vancouver. They found everything correct, but informed the city that they could not use back taxes as an asset against their loan, as they had been doing. An editorial comment on the audit stated: “Since Auditor Stein made his report on the city finances, some citizens appear to have gone into mourning over the discovery that Revelstoke is not bankrupt, and that former Mayors, Aldermen or City officials have not stolen the city funds.”

100 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Feb.12, 1920

The Canadian ski-jumping championship was again landed by Nels Nelsen for the fourth time in succession and with a largely increased lead over his former record. With ideal conditions existing on the hill, and in the presence of about 2,000 people, he made the phenomenal jump of 185 feet, also capturing the prize for form. Anna Gunnersen took first place in the ladies’ two-mile ski race.

90 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Feb.12, 1930

Miss Joey Carmichael was crowned Carnival Queen at the closing dance of the annual Winter Carnival. The dance, held in the Masonic hall, was attended by a very large number. This was the fourth year that a queen had been elected for the Winter Carnival. The previous queens were Laura Robbins in 1927, Henrietta Nelsen in 1928, and Mary Hume in 1929.

80 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Feb. 15, 1940

The ski trio of Bill and Don McCrae and Jimmy McDonald were finding the 65 mile stretch between Jasper and the Columbia Icefields to be extremely difficult because of lack of snow. The men were nearing the end of their 500 mile ski trip from Revelstoke to Jasper, and then to Banff.

70 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Feb. 16, 1950

Revelstoke Ski Club hosted the Norwegian Ski Jumping team at the recent ski meet, with more than 5000 spectators in attendance. The Norwegian team had come directly from the world championships in Lake Placid. Arnfinn Bergmann, described as a jumper of great power and style, made jumps of 256 and 266 feet, winning the second day of the tournament.

60 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Feb.11, 1960

Revelstoke Ski Club was sponsoring a showing of the film “Vagabonds of the Mountains,” filmed and narrated by Hans Gmoser. It was advertised as a story showing people who enjoy deep powder skiing in the Canadian Rockies.

50 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Feb. 12, 1970

Cooper’s Supermarket (the current Red Apple building) was planning to expand to double its original size. A contract for the expansion was awarded to Rocco Zappone’s Revelstoke Construction Ltd. Cooper’s opened at that location in 1963.

40 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Feb. 13, 1980

Representatives from Farrell’s Mobile Home Park (near the current Railway Museum site), asked city c ouncil to request that CPR limit blockages at the crossing to a maximum of 10 minutes. Ironically, some of the delegation didn’t make it to the meeting because they were stopped at the crossing by train traffic.

30 years ago: Revelstoke Review, Feb. 14, 1990

A California woman was traveling to Edmonton when a small snowslide hit her car alongside Three Valley Lake. The car was partially buried under soft snow, but the driver was able to escape and was picked up by a highway crew. Shortly afterwards, the car was buried beneath five feet of snow by a second, bigger avalanche.


 

@RevelstokeRevue
editor@revelstoketimesreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Local History