How do you want to live your life when you grow older?

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day seeks to raise awareness of what qualifies as abuse and how to deal with it.

By Stephanie Melnyk, Coordinator, Community Response Network

Imagine you are a happy, healthy parent with school-aged kids.  Your life is very busy caring for your family, looking after your home, going to work and finding time to go biking or have a coffee with a friend.

Now imagine 30 or 40 years have passed.  You finally have the time to do all the things you wanted but now need help to enjoy your life fully. Your kids are adults and living lives of their own, your spouse has passed away and you have had some health issues. Taking care of your home, large shopping trips and travelling require help from others.

It’s no surprise that as we age, we require more support in order to live our lives in the way that we want. As a result, we become more dependent on others, which increases our risk for abuse. The word ‘abuse’ brings to mind the most serious examples, but something as common as being an adult who is told what to do against their will still constitutes abuse.

“Older adults in our communities continue to find themselves in vulnerable situations and experience various forms of abuse and neglect,” says Sherry Baker, Executive Director of the BC Association of Community Response Networks. According to the Ministry of Health, up to 10 per cent of seniors in B.C. will experience some form of physical, emotional, financial or sexual abuse. It is believed that this statistic is actually higher since the abuse of seniors is significantly under reported.

The problem is not unique to British Columbia or to Canada. In 2006, the United Nations officially proclaimed June 15 as World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. It is well-recognized that the abuse of older adults is a multi-dimensional problem. It is an issue of family violence, an intergenerational concern, a health problem, a justice problem and a human rights issue.

According to the United Nations, “the world needs a global response to the problem. One that focuses on protecting the rights of older adults.” Accordingly, Community Response Networks (CRNs) across B.C. are focusing on the rights of older people, including the right to dignity, privacy, freedom and the pursuit of happiness in old age.

The Revelstoke CRN has been working to end abuse and neglect of all adults, not just of seniors, since 2004. We are encouraging the community to recognize this year’s World Elder Abuse Awareness Day by asking “How do I want to be treated as I age?”  Then, ask the same of older adults in your life and work with them to make it a reality.

For more information about World Elder Abuse Awareness Day or the BC Association of CRNs, visit www.bccrns.ca or contact Interior Health at 250-837-2131 x204.  If you have any questions for the Revelstoke CRN, email revycrn@gmail.com.

 

Just Posted

Revelstoke developer frustrated with permit delays

Phase 2-3 of Mackenzie Village has been with city staff for 18 months

Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past

125 Years Ago: Kootenay Star, December 16, 1893 There were about 200… Continue reading

Avalanche control scheduled today on Highway 1 east and west of Revelstoke

Avalanche control work is scheduled today for two different locations along Highway… Continue reading

Revy let’s talk: Christmas cheer, or not

It’s Christmas time in Revelstoke. It’s a time of celebration, lights are… Continue reading

Snowfall warning issued for Highway 1 from east of Sicamous to Golden

Environment Canada says to expect 15-30 cm of snow by Thursday evening

Update: BC RCMP confirm multiple businesses received email threats throughout province

Police Dog Service on scene at Penticton Honda and Penticton Hyundai

Some Kotex tampons recalled in Canada and U.S.

In some cases, tampon users sought medical attention “to remove tampon pieces left in the body.”

Sex-assault squad investigated eight incidents at Toronto all-boys’ school

The interim president of a Roman Catholic all-boys school rocked by student-on-student abuse allegations said the football program was cancelled for next year.

Coal power in Canada must disappear by the end of 2029, new regulations say

Canada has significantly cut its dependence on coal largely due to the closure of all coal plants in Ontario.

‘Naive approach’ to China at fault in Meng mess: Scheer

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer called on the Trudeau government to “unequivocally denounce any type of repercussions to Canadians on foreign soil.”

Omar Khadr ‘a model of compliance,’ wants changes to bail conditions: lawyer

Former Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr is back in court today to seek changes to bail conditions.

West Kelowna student finalist for $100,000 scholarship

Nhi Dao, Grade 12 Mouch Boucherie Secondary student, cited for her community service

Supreme Court upholds Canada’s right to reargue facts in assisted-dying case

Julia Lamb and the B.C. Civil Liberties Association are spearheading a challenge of the law

B.C. company facing several charges in 2017 chicken abuse case

CFIA investigation leads to 38 charges against Elite Farm Services and Ontario-based Sofina Foods

Most Read