Roughly 30 logging trucks and another 30 cars took part and drove through the city to honour Doug Dillman. (Submitted)

Roughly 30 logging trucks and another 30 cars took part and drove through the city to honour Doug Dillman. (Submitted)

Legendary Revelstoke logger honoured with truck convoy

Doug Dillman was a logging truck driver for more than 30 years

A convoy of logging trucks drove through Revelstoke on Dec. 12 to honour a local legend.

Logging truck driver Doug Dillman died suddenly earlier this month and his family said they wanted him honoured the way he deserved.

Doug Dillman loved the thrill of driving a truck down a logging road. (Submitted)

“He was a legend in this town,” said Leah Zacker, daughter.

Dillman worked as a logger in Revelstoke for more than 30 years. Zacker said logging was his passion.

“He loved the thrill and adventure of logging, especially climbing roads in an oversized truck.”

The Dillman family has worked in forestry for more than eight decades.

Zacker said she came up with the idea of a convoy while visiting her dad in hospital and noticing passing logging trucks.

“It was a way to celebrate his life.”

Roughly 30 logging trucks and another 30 cars took part. The parade of vehicles started at the Big Eddy Pub, drove Victoria Rd. to Downie Mill and parked at the baseball diamonds by the river.

COVID-19 restrictions have severely reduced social gatherings for funerals in an attempt to help stop the spread of the virus. The province currently allows 10 people to attend a ceremony, but no receptions before or after are permitted.

Zacker said the convoy was a way for the community to recognize her father in a safe and responsible manner.

“He would have loved the convoy. He wanted to be celebrated, not mourned. Didn’t want a bunch of people sitting around, crying,” she said.

The parade of logging trucks parked by the ball diamonds at the Columbia River to take photos and pay respects. (Submitted)

While the trucks were parked beside the river, Zacker said an eagle flew above , the storm clouds parted and a ray of sunlight appeared.

“It was like he was there. He was there leading the convoy.”

Eagles were Dillman’s favourite bird.

From the river, the vehicles headed north along Highway 23, the main road Dillman drove for work.

On one of Dillman’s last night’s with his family, another daughter Carlee White, asked if he had any life advice to share.

To which he replied, “If you aren’t broke go get a Coca Cola. If you don’t want to be beside me I’ll let you go. A guy should stop at a hotel room once a month for a good sleep.”

White said her dad kept his humour right to the end of his life.

“He could make a joke out of anything!”

The family said there will be a celebration of life for Dillman when health restrictions allow.

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
jocelyn.doll@revelstokereview.com


 

@RevelstokeRevue
editor@revelstoketimesreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Death

 

Doug Dillman loved the thrill of driving a truck down a logging road. (Submitted)

Doug Dillman loved the thrill of driving a truck down a logging road. (Submitted)

The parade of logging trucks parked by the ball diamonds at the Columbia River to take photos and pay respects. (Submitted)

The parade of logging trucks parked by the ball diamonds at the Columbia River to take photos and pay respects. (Submitted)