The Allan Brooks Nature Centre is kicking off a Light The Night fundraising campaign online to help with Christmas shopping for the public and fundraising for the popular Vernon attraction. (ABNC Photo)

The Allan Brooks Nature Centre is kicking off a Light The Night fundraising campaign online to help with Christmas shopping for the public and fundraising for the popular Vernon attraction. (ABNC Photo)

Light the Night campaign boosts North Okanagan nature centre

Allan Brooks Society hosting online auction of 12 items; donations can also be made to help centre

A Christmas auction will help a popular Vernon attraction.

The Allan Brooks Nature Center Society (ABNC) will light up a Christmas star on-site on Tuesday, Dec. 1, in celebration of the holidays and 20 years of community service.

While the nature centre doors have closed to visitors for the season and nature rests for the winter, the board of directors, staff and volunteers have prepared an end-of-year gift-giving campaign, Light the Night, to ensure funds to support the coming year.

The public is asked to give what they can by placing a bid on an auction item, giving a monetary donation, or by purchasing a membership.

“Although we were unable to honour our 20-year anniversary this summer the way we hoped with a big event, we were able to continue some of our programming in spite of COVID-19 restrictions,” said nature centre manager Cheryl Hood. “We will have the chance to gather and celebrate our success at the centre in the future. For now, end of year donations are greatly appreciated to help fill the void of being unable to host our annual Gala fundraiser.”

ABNC is making Christmas shopping easy with an online auction of 12 incredible gift items available.

Items include Bordeaux wine, jewelry, monthly flower bouquets for a year, fashion items, virtual golf lessons, ski passes and more. Items will be available for viewing online at abnc.ca/board/light-the-night/ starting on Thursday, Nov. 26, and the auction opens on Friday, Dec. 4, for bidding, closing Sunday, Dec. 6 at 9 p.m.

With every minimum $50 donation to the Allan Brooks Nature Centre before Christmas, donors will receive a 2020 charitable tax receipt as well as a hand-crafted Christmas star ornament. Donations can be made in any amount, online at canadahelps.org/en/dn/19104 (CanadaHelps) or by calling the centre at 250-260-4227.

A 2021 ABNC Membership makes for a great stocking stuffer gift item for every nature enthusiast. Member benefits include a $20 charitable tax receipt, 10 per cent discount on select events, workshops and gift shop purchases, and family members receive 15 per cent discount on summer camps and birthday parties. Membership rates start at just $30.

“Our education team has been working hard to deliver Nature in the Classroom programs in the off-season and we are excited to launch our new online curriculum-based learning program, starting with Grade 4 education, in the new year,” said Hood. “It’s fundraising campaigns like Light the Night that gives security to ABNC and keeps us thriving.”

Proceeds from Light the Night will support the ongoing commitment to nature education and habitat preservation efforts by the Allan Brooks Nature Centre.

READ MORE: Vernon nature centre celebrates 20 years

READ MORE: Vernon nature centre auctioning off dinner under the stars



roger@vernonmorningstar.com

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