Iconic Mt. Begbie - a mountain the NCES has sought protection for over the years. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

Iconic Mt. Begbie - a mountain the NCES has sought protection for over the years. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

North Columbia Environmental Society votes in favour of joining Wildsight

The decision still needs to be finalized and the merge could happen next year

The North Columbia Environmental Society (NCES) has voted in favour of becoming part of Wildsight at their annual general meeting last month.

“The vote was unanimous,” said Kent Christensen, president.

However, the decision is not yet finalized and has to be approved by Wildsight, a ecological conservation organization with numerous branches throughout the province. The group has 1,900 members.

Christensen said one of the benefits for joining Wildsight is gaining more legitimacy when dealing with government and industry and having more resources to draw on, such as working with experts on issues relevant to Revelstoke like caribou, sustainable forestry and single use plastics.

“It would allow us to have a bigger impact in the community and grow,” he said.

The main local issues of interest for the NCES include urging governments to create a new backcountry access land use plan and advocating against logging in old growth forests, such as in Argonaut creek north of Revelstoke.

READ MORE: Environmental society wants to protect Mt. Begbie from development

The NCES started in 1999 and has 140 members.

If the organization does become part of Wildsight, the NCES would cease to exist. However, Christensen said a Revelstoke Wildsight chapter would still stay autonomous and focused on local issues.

He said if approved, the merge could happen by next year.

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
jocelyn.doll@revelstokereview.com


 

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Environment