Several Revelstokians banded together to save an American kestrel falcon earlier this month. It is now recovering at a wildlife hospital in Kamloops. (Suzanne Brighton photo)

Several Revelstokians banded together to save an American kestrel falcon earlier this month. It is now recovering at a wildlife hospital in Kamloops. (Suzanne Brighton photo)

Revelstokians rescue baby American kestrel falcon

The bird is now recovering at the BC Wildlife Park animal hospital in Kamloops

An American kestrel falcon rescued in Revelstoke is recovering well at the BC Wildlife park hospital in Kamloops.

Earlier in August, two baby birds appeared to have fallen out of their nest near Peaks Lodge, while one flew away, the other had a broken wing.

Tracy Reynolds, animal care manager at the park, said the bird has two fractures and is on cage rest, however, he is starting to fly again.

She said he will be moved to a flight pen for a few weeks and then released.

The broken falcon was found by Jocelyn Ross. She cared for the bird with the help of bird enthusiast Corrine Cancelliere. Cancelliere later arranged a ride to the animal hospital.

Cancelliere has bird watched with her mother Darlene ever since spotting a brambling, a white rumped black headed bird in the finch family, which is wide-spread across Europe and Asia. The two spotted the bird in the Revelstoke.

“Ever since that day I have been absolutely obsessed with birds,” Cancelliere said. “I know every call and all the funny little things they do.”

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Cancelliere said she regularly helps smaller birds, and more often then not they just need a safe place to rest if they run into a window, but this is the first large bird she has helped rescue.

Cancelliere said she worries house cats will kill wild birds and requests people put bells on their outdoor felines to help protect her feathered friends.

A 2013 study by Environment Canada, found cats kill more than 200 million birds yearly in Canada. The study indicated cats are the number one killer of birds in Canada.

Reynolds said American kestrel falcon are not rare in Revelstoke or B.C.

In her years of bird watching, Cancelliere has developed a list to determine whether a bird is injured:

  • if approached and doesn’t fly away
  • open or obvious wound
  • closed eyes
  • quiet
  • puffed or fluffed feathers (look bloated or swollen)
  • if wings not hanging symmetrically
  • breathing problems
  • lame or unable to stand (lean to one side)
  • dull looking (look sleepy)

Cancelliere said if you are in the Revelstoke area and find an injured bird she is available to help. She can be reached at 250-683-8512 or via email at corrinelunn85@live.ca or you can contact the animal hospital directly at 250-319-1129.


 

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jocelyn.doll@revelstokereview.com

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Revelstokians rescue baby American kestrel falcon