Spreading love and kindness in Nakusp

The rocks are painted and then hidden around town. Those who find them can keep them, leave them where they are or hide them elsewhere. (Submitted)The rocks are painted and then hidden around town. Those who find them can keep them, leave them where they are or hide them elsewhere. (Submitted)
Brigette Henning is one of the creators of the Nakusp Rocks community group that is painting and hiding rocks in the community. (Submitted)Brigette Henning is one of the creators of the Nakusp Rocks community group that is painting and hiding rocks in the community. (Submitted)
Brigette Henning is one of the creators of the Nakusp Rocks community group that is painting and hiding rocks in the community. (Submitted)Brigette Henning is one of the creators of the Nakusp Rocks community group that is painting and hiding rocks in the community. (Submitted)
The rocks are painted and then hidden around town. Those who find them can keep them, leave them where they are or hide them elsewhere. (Submitted)The rocks are painted and then hidden around town. Those who find them can keep them, leave them where they are or hide them elsewhere. (Submitted)
Brigette Henning started painting rocks after losing her daughter six years ago. (Submitted)
The rocks are painted and then hidden around town. Those who find them can keep them, leave them where they are or hide them elsewhere. (Submitted)
The rocks are painted and then hidden around town. Those who find them can keep them, leave them where they are or hide them elsewhere. (Submitted)

For Brigette Henning the rock hunt is much more than spreading a little bit of colour around the community.

The art of painting and hiding rocks for others to find is popular on Vancouver Island, where Henning and her family used to live.

Though at the time she didn’t see herself as a painter, she said she loved taking her kids out to find and rehide the rocks. When her daughter Ashley died six years ago, a friend of Henning’s painted memorial rocks and hid them all over the world, while on holidays.

Soon people were finding them and Henning was seeing pictures of the memorial rocks on the beach in Mexico, beside a bonfire in New Zealand or with a cheetah in Africa.

“Knowing that people were enjoying the rock hunt helped keep her memory alive,” she said, in an email interview.

Henning moved to Nakusp from Victoria last year, bringing her love of painting rocks with her.

Soon she had her co-workers on board and they got together for physically-distanced rock painting parties. Karolina Lamont is one of those.

“It brings people together,” she said, via email. “It brings hope and happiness to people in difficult times, whether you paint, gift, find, keep or re-hide a beautifully painted rock. It is simply to spread love and kindness.”

READ MORE: Kaslo biologist questions logging at unique West Kootenay bat site

Henning said they had initially planned to start hiding the rocks in spring, when the snow melted, but the need to spread some love couldn’t wait.

“And my husband was getting overwhelmed with all the piles of rocks everywhere,” Henning said, with a laugh.

With help from her friends Karolina and Trevor Lamont, Nakusp Rocks, a Facebook group where people can share photos of their creations as well as where they are found, was born.

Henning said they had 127 people join in the first 48 hours. Messages and posts are flowing in, thanking Henning and the group for messages of hope and added colour the rocks are bringing.

“I truly believe a person will find a rock exactly when they need it,” Henning said.

She has painted pride rocks as well as rocks with mental health inspiration messages such as ‘you are loved’ and ‘tomorrow will be better.’

The page features tips and tricks for wildlife and environmentally friendly paints and resins. Due to current COVID restrictions, rocks cannot be hidden inside businesses or public buildings.

READ MORE: Late season start frustrating for Nakusp ski hill


 

@ArrowLakesNews
editor@arrowlakesnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Nakusp

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Youth from Vernon, Kelowna, Penticton and the Kootenays were able to dig into two evenings of online learning and connection through United Way Southern Interior B.C.’s <CODE>anagan program. (Submitted)<code> </code>
CODEanagan gives youth a chance to learn about technology

The youth, aged 12 to 21, built their own WordPress sites and developed blogging ideas

A rainbow shining on Kelowna General Hospital on May 12, 2020 International Nurses Day. (Steve Wensley - Prime Light Media)
New COVID cases trending down in Interior Health

24 new cases reported Thursday, Feb. 25, death at Kelowna General Hospital

A rendering of a proposed four-unit development on Downie St. (Monashees Drafting & Design)
Row housing proposed on Downie St. in Revelstoke

A zoning amendment and public hearing are required for the project

I hope the pandemic doesn’t kill the bulk section. I like to choose my own candy. (File)
Skiing on Mount Revelstoke in 1950 with Heather Lodge in the background. Photo by Earle Dickey. (Revelstoke Museum photo #8560)
Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past for Feb. 25

Elizabeth Haupt Collections Manager Intern 130 years ago: Kootenay Star, Feb. 28,… Continue reading

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
B.C. reports 10 additional deaths, 395 new COVID-19 cases

The majority of new coronavirus infections were in the Fraser Health region

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen, all 20, drown in the Sooke River in February 2020. (Contributed photos)
Coroner confirms ‘puddle jumping’ in 2020 drowning deaths of 3 B.C. men

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen pulled into raging river driving through nearby flooding

Castlegar doctor Megan Taylor contracted COVID-19 in November. This photo was taken before the pandemic. Photo: Submitted
Kootenay doctor shares experience contracting COVID-19

Castlegar doctor shares her COVID experience

The booklet roots present day activism in the history of racist policies, arguing the history must be acknowledged in order to change. (CCPA)
New resource dives into 150 years of racist policy in B.C.

Racist history must be acknowledged in order to change, authors say

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller, before she knew she would change literature. Photo Wikipedia
And Then There Were None

What book knocked your booties off when you were young?

A webinar on dealing with dementia will be held Wednesday, March 10, 2021 (Submitted)
Webinar on dementia scheduled for March 10

Okanagan residents invited to event on legal issues surrounding dementia

The BC SPCA is offering many chances for school-aged kids to learn about animal welfare and other animal topics. Pictured here is Keith, a three-month-old kitten seen on Nov. 4, 2020 at the Chilliwack SPCA. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
From pets to wildlife, BC SPCA offers animal education programs geared to youth

BC SPCA offering virtual spring break camps, workshops and school presentations

Nanaimo-raised singer Allison Crowe with director Zack Snyder on the set of ‘Man of Steel’ in 2011. Crowe performs a cover of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah in the upcoming director’s cut of ‘Justice League.’ (Photo courtesy Clay Enos)
B.C. musician records song for upcoming ‘Justice League’ film

Allison Crowe’s close connection to director led to rendition of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah

Most Read