Workshop helps Okanagan caregivers explore grief and loss

Dementia Dialogues session July 16

Vernon residents with dementia, their family members, caregivers, and staff who support them all experience some form of grief throughout the progression of the disease.

Ambiguous loss is the set of feelings commonly experienced while grieving over the person living with dementia being cared for. It may feel like they are leaving a little bit each day.

To help Vernon residents better understand their feelings, the non-profit Alzheimer Society of B.C. brings a free interactive workshop to the city on Tuesday, July 16.

The Dementia Dialogues session is a facilitated discussion, encouraging caregivers to discuss their loss and grief as they witness the progression of their family member’s dementia.

The free session runs from 10 a.m. to noon at The People Place, 3402 – 27 Ave. Pre-registration is required by contacting 250-860-0305 (toll-free 1-800-634-3399) or acampbell@alzheimerbc.org.

Dementia Dialogues are unique interactive learning opportunities for family caregivers. With the help of a facilitator, they connect with one another and increase their knowledge about dementia and caregiving skills.

The workshop is free thanks to partial funding by the Collings Family Foundation, The R.K. Grant Family Foundation, The 1988 Foundation, Margaret Rothweiler Charitable Foundation, Paul Lee Family Foundation, Provincial Employees Community Service Fund, the Kapler-Carter Foundation, Djavad Mowafaghian Foundation, The Rix Family Foundation, Seacliff Foundation, Jack Brown & Family Alzheimer Research Foundation, Diane Harwood Memorial Trust, Lewis Family Fund, The Clark Family Foundation, Colin & Lois Pritchard Foundation, the Lecky Foundation, and by the generous contributions of individual donors.

The Alzheimer Society of B.C. acknowledges the financial support of the Province of British Columbia.

Dementia Dialogues are offered through the Alzheimer Society of B.C.’s First Link dementia support, which connects individuals living with dementia, their family and friends to programs and services at any stage of the disease.

If you are living with dementia or have questions about the disease, visit www.alzheimerbc.org and call the First Link Dementia Helpline at 1-800-936-6033 (English), 1-833-674-5007 (Cantonese and Mandarin) or 1-833-674-5003 (Punjabi).

READ MORE: Workshop will show Vernon residents living with dementia how to capture their story


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