Craig Lebleau is the star of Mud Mountain Haulers along with his family and company Lebleau Brothers Haulers. (Photo submitted)

Craig Lebleau is the star of Mud Mountain Haulers along with his family and company Lebleau Brothers Haulers. (Photo submitted)

Mud Mountain Haulers shine light on forest industry

New TV show, featuring Lebeau Brothers Logging, filmed in Cariboo, Shuswap and Revelstoke

A light will be shone on the log hauling industry this winter with the premiere of Mud Mountain Haulers.

The series, set to premiere tonight, Monday, Jan. 25, on Discovery Canada, was produced and masterminded by executive producer Mark Miller. He’s previously worked Highway Through Hell and Heavy Rescue: 401 and is hoping that Mud Mountain Haulers will be similarly successful.

Mud Mountain Haulers is really a show about those who help keep toilet paper on our rolls and wood on the trucks so we can build our homes and apartment buildings,” Miller said, adding the show aims to clear up some misconceptions people have about the forest industry. “It’s really kind of a salute to the hard-working folks who work in the forest and keeps our country running.”

He first got the idea for the show while making Highway Through Hell, he said, when they would often encounter logging truck drivers on the road. Miller said he soon realized these drivers were unique compared to the long-haul truckers, noting they often operate on “an ice rink” driving down treacherous service roads, which requires a tremendous amount of skill.

READ MORE: Xeni Gwet’in wild horses and riders featured in History channel documentary series

He also discovered there was a type of brotherhood in the industry and thought that it would be a cool world to explore. During their research, Miller said they met Craig Lebeau, a third-generation logger who runs Lebeau Brothers Logging in Kamloops. Lebeau first started working in the industry in the 1950s, is the star of the show, which looks at how he wants to preserve his family legacy, keep his employees employed and protect the environment he relies upon for his livelihood.

Miller said the show shines a light on how much drivers like Lebeau and his family care about what they do and what type of effort they put into ensuring their loads reach their destinations. Miller said he used to look at the crisscrossing service roads and trails in Nelson and “honestly couldn’t understand how you could move a 140,000-pound load down that mountain and not kill yourself.

The show was filmed across the South Cariboo and Thompson regions, from Kamloops Lake to Shuswap Lake and Revelstoke to just South of Salmon Arm. Miller said they’ve produced eight episodes for the first season many of which were filmed during the opening stages of the pandemic last year and wrapped up in late May.

“We started filming in the end of February of last year and 15 days later COVID hit. So we had to continue filming through COVID and figure out how to do that and it was a very interesting experience how we were able to adapt and treat COVID like another safety risk,” Miller said. “I’m really happy to report we were a COVID free show, no one got sick.”

To prevent the spread of any possible infection, Miller said they deployed multiple vehicles, limiting the number of crew members on set and making use of remote control cameras.

“Thank God for GoPros,” Miller remarked with a laugh.

The first episode airs tonight at 10 p.m. and will be run for the next eight weeks. Miller thinks residents of 100 Mile House, with its history of the logging industry, will have a real connection to the show.

“This is a show about logging that paints logging in a positive light and I’m really proud of that.”


newsroom@100milefreepress.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Movies & TV

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A health worker holds a vial of AstraZeneca vaccine to be administered to members of the police at a COVID-19 vaccination center in Mainz, Germany, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021. (Andreas Arnold/dpa via AP)
43 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health

368 cases in the region remain active

A real estate sign is pictured in Vancouver, Tuesday, June, 12, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)
Okanagan-Shuswap real estate market continues hot start to 2021

Sales in February were up more than 100 per cent over last year, reports the Association of Interior Realtors

John Hordyk said it isn’t fair to just look at COVID-19 deaths as many survivors are experiencing long-term impacts, himself included. (Photo by Rachel Muise)
Not getting better: Revelstoke man diagnosed with post-COVID-19 syndrome

‘I hope the damage isn’t long term, but it could be permanent’

Phase four of the Kicking Horse Canyon project will twin the winding stretch of the Trans-Canada Highway just east of Golden. (file photo)
Trans-Canada Highway reduced to one lane east of Golden

It’s the first of the Kicking Horse Canyon Phase 4 closures which will ramp up in the coming weeks

Health Minister Adrian Dix looks on as Dr. Bonnie Henry pauses for a moment as she gives her daily media briefing regarding COVID-19 for British Columbia in Victoria, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
7 additional deaths and 542 new COVID-19 cases in B.C.

Provincial health officials reported 18 new COVID-19 cases linked to variants of concern

Lisa Jilg is pictured at her store with signs requesting the donation of items for those struggling with mental health challenges, and those experiencing homelessness. (Contributed)
‘He just wanted to be accepted’: Okanagan mother opens up about son’s fatal overdose

Judgment toward those with mental health challenges needs to stop, says West Kelowna mother

A protest has been planned for March 5, 2020 over Penticton council’s decision to reject an application from BC Housing to keep an emergency winter shelter open over a year longer than originally planned. (Jesse Day - Western News)
‘Bring your tent’: Protest planned in Penticton’s Gyro Park over winter shelter closure

Protesters plan to show council ‘what the result of their decision will look like’

Although B.C. has not made masks mandatory in public indoor spaces, some business owners are requiring all customers to wear them before entering their store. (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
EDITORIAL: Heightened tension over face masks

Incidents of anger and conflicts over mandated masks happening too frequently

A recently finished $4.3-million taxiway extension at the Victoria International Airport (not pictured) is unusable because of a blind spot. (Black Press Media file photo)
Blind spot leaves Victoria airport’s new $4.3-million taxiway extension unusable

Solution has been put on hold by COVID-19 pandemic, says airport authority

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

The City of Vancouver estimates there are 3,500 Canada geese in the city right now, and that number is growing. (Bruce Hogarth)
Help tame Vancouver’s Canada goose population by reporting nests: park officials

The city is asking residents to be on the lookout so staff can remove nests or addle eggs

Chief Justice Christopher Hinkson (Office of the Chief Justice)
Judge questions whether B.C.’s top doctor appreciated right to religious freedom

Lawyer for province says Dr. Henry has outlined the reasons for her orders publicly

Penticton mayor John Vassilaki responded to BC Housing minster David Eby’s remarks that the city has put themselves at risk of creating a tent city Wednesday, March 3, 2020. (Western News file photo)
Penticton mayor calls out BC Housing minister for ‘irresponsible fear-mongering’

Council recently rejected BC Housing’s request to keep a winter shelter open longer than first planned

Most Read