Lake Country native Evan-Riley Brown is in the cast for the new film Journey To Royal: A WW II Rescue Mission to be released on video on demand and streaming services on Feb. 2. (Contributed)

Lake Country native Evan-Riley Brown is in the cast for the new film Journey To Royal: A WW II Rescue Mission to be released on video on demand and streaming services on Feb. 2. (Contributed)

Okanagan actor lands role in WW II movie

Evan-Riley Brown, from Lake Country, cast in production labelled as hybrid of a feature film and documentary called Journey To Royal: a WW II Rescue Mission.

It has been a four-year wait for a Central Okanagan actor in the cast of a new hybrid production that combines elements of a documentary and feature film.

Evan-Riley Brown plays the role of Staff-Sgt. Weaver in the Second World War retelling of a true story of heroism called Journey To Royal: A WWII Rescue Mission.

The film will make its debut on streaming and video-on-demand services on Feb. 2.

“We did the filming for the move four years ago but it has taken this long to be released because of the CGI work that was involved,” said Brown.

“I am looking forward to it coming out.”

While his family and relatives will likely gather together to watch it, Brown admits he will probably avoid any family premiere celebration.

“It is hard for me to watch a movie with me in it because you tend to notice all the imperfections and how you might have done a scene differently,” he said.

“From a craft perspective, you tend to analyze yourself rather than just watch the movie.”

READ MORE: Okanagan musicians struggling in silence through pandemic

The movie release marks a recent upswing in Brown’s career, with a lead role in another movie called Kill Spree being released later this year and a short-film called Isolation currently being showcased on the film festival circuit.

He is also working on two screenplays that he hopes to draw interest from potential producers, one being about the gangster era in Montreal during the 1970s.

Journey To Royal tells the true story of Lieut. Royal Stratton, a pilot with an emergency rescue squadron in the South Pacific, who leads a mission to save the lives of nine downed airmen.

Flying unarmed into the path of the enemy, Stratton’s flight crew intersect with pivotal turning points of the war and must rely on their wits, skill and fortitude to survive.

The feature film aspect of the movie is combined with historical photos and first-hand accounts of surviving Second World War veterans.

Brown said he was drawn to the script because it was not a propaganda movie that glorifies war in the wrong ways.

“I submitted my name for an audition, eventually got a chance to read for it, and a month later I found out I got the part,” he said.

Brown grew up in the Lake Country community of Winfield and graduated from George Elliot Secondary with dreams of becoming an actor.

He traces the roots of his love for acting to when he saw The Mask, starring Jim Carrey, at age of three.

That interest persisted through his childhood, leading him at age 18 to pursue his career dreams in Hollywood.

He studied at the legendary Stella Adler school of acting in Los Angeles, earning a full scholarship to the school program in his second year, an experience he credits for honing his craft skills as an actor.

“It has been a great influence for me…Actor Mark Ruffalo is a graduate of the program also and he came back to speak to us about his experiences, how he went to 400 auditions without getting a single role.

“It was nice to hear sometimes how other people have struggled so you don’t feel alone…to keep trying to stick with it.”

Brown remembers a wide-eyed Canadian kid moving to Hollywood as a struggling actor being a harsh lesson in reality.

READ MORE: Kelowna musician’s anti-bullying anthem receives international award

The Lake Country local found L.A. to be an unfriendly city, where just saying hello to people as you pass them by led to strange looks, where everyone seems to claim to be an actor and film projects are often talked about or promoted but rarely come to fruition.

He found an initial break portraying the character Annihilist in Video Game High School, an Internet web series that ran from 2012 to 2016.

Shortly after the election of Donald Trump as the U.S. president in 2016, Brown said changes to his visa credentials convinced him to return home rather than risk paying the $6,000 non-refundable fee to earn a three-year extension to his working visa that promised, if accepted, to further limit his work options to either an actor or writer and not both as had been the case previously.

“With COVID and everything that has happened, 2020 was actually not a bad year for me as I have been doing a lot of writing and living in the comfort of my own hometown. And these films that I have previously worked on are starting to be released this year, so I am looking forward to seeing that happen,” he said.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Movies

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Youth from Vernon, Kelowna, Penticton and the Kootenays were able to dig into two evenings of online learning and connection through United Way Southern Interior B.C.’s <CODE>anagan program. (Submitted)<code> </code>
CODEanagan gives youth a chance to learn about technology

The youth, aged 12 to 21, built their own WordPress sites and developed blogging ideas

A rainbow shining on Kelowna General Hospital on May 12, 2020 International Nurses Day. (Steve Wensley - Prime Light Media)
New COVID cases trending down in Interior Health

24 new cases reported Thursday, Feb. 25, death at Kelowna General Hospital

A rendering of a proposed four-unit development on Downie St. (Monashees Drafting & Design)
Row housing proposed on Downie St. in Revelstoke

A zoning amendment and public hearing are required for the project

I hope the pandemic doesn’t kill the bulk section. I like to choose my own candy. (File)
Skiing on Mount Revelstoke in 1950 with Heather Lodge in the background. Photo by Earle Dickey. (Revelstoke Museum photo #8560)
Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past for Feb. 25

Elizabeth Haupt Collections Manager Intern 130 years ago: Kootenay Star, Feb. 28,… Continue reading

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
B.C. reports 10 additional deaths, 395 new COVID-19 cases

The majority of new coronavirus infections were in the Fraser Health region

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen, all 20, drown in the Sooke River in February 2020. (Contributed photos)
Coroner confirms ‘puddle jumping’ in 2020 drowning deaths of 3 B.C. men

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen pulled into raging river driving through nearby flooding

Castlegar doctor Megan Taylor contracted COVID-19 in November. This photo was taken before the pandemic. Photo: Submitted
Kootenay doctor shares experience contracting COVID-19

Castlegar doctor shares her COVID experience

The booklet roots present day activism in the history of racist policies, arguing the history must be acknowledged in order to change. (CCPA)
New resource dives into 150 years of racist policy in B.C.

Racist history must be acknowledged in order to change, authors say

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller, before she knew she would change literature. Photo Wikipedia
And Then There Were None

What book knocked your booties off when you were young?

A webinar on dealing with dementia will be held Wednesday, March 10, 2021 (Submitted)
Webinar on dementia scheduled for March 10

Okanagan residents invited to event on legal issues surrounding dementia

The BC SPCA is offering many chances for school-aged kids to learn about animal welfare and other animal topics. Pictured here is Keith, a three-month-old kitten seen on Nov. 4, 2020 at the Chilliwack SPCA. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
From pets to wildlife, BC SPCA offers animal education programs geared to youth

BC SPCA offering virtual spring break camps, workshops and school presentations

Nanaimo-raised singer Allison Crowe with director Zack Snyder on the set of ‘Man of Steel’ in 2011. Crowe performs a cover of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah in the upcoming director’s cut of ‘Justice League.’ (Photo courtesy Clay Enos)
B.C. musician records song for upcoming ‘Justice League’ film

Allison Crowe’s close connection to director led to rendition of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah

Most Read