(Revelstoke Museum & Archives Photo No. 4534) The CPR Hotel, located behind the railway station, was built in 1897 and dismantled in 1928.

Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past

  • Jun. 13, 2018 4:00 p.m.

Travel to the past through these items from Revelstoke newspapers, as gleaned and edited by Cathy English, curator of Revelstoke Museum & Archives.

125 Years Ago: Kootenay Star, June 17, 1893

The CPR had men working for the past two weeks to drain the townsite at the station, in preparation for the clearing of 100 acres for residential and other buildings. This is the area of town that now includes most of our downtown, and the residential area between Mackenzie Avenue and the Victoria Road/Fourth Street crossing. Much of the land on Mackenzie Avenue close to Victoria was swampy and needed to be drained and filled.

120 Years Ago: Revelstoke Herald, June 11, 1898

The Taylor block, built by contractor John Kernaghan, was nearing completion on Mackenzie Avenue, and James Gill was preparing to open his dry goods store in the new building. It was owned by local businessman T.E.L. Taylor and burned down in 1916. The CPR Telegraph office was built on that location in 1930, and now houses Chubby Funsters restaurant.

100 Years Ago: Revelstoke Review, June 13, 1918

Miss Olive Hayes, provincial demonstrator in war food recipes and economies was in the city giving demonstrations in city hall. One lecture was on the need of using substitutes for wheat flour and meat in order that there would be sufficient food available for the Allied armies.

90 Years Ago: Revelstoke Review, June 13, 1928

The former CPR Hotel on the hill behind the railway station was being dismantled. It had been inactive since the previous summer. It was built in 1897 as part of the CPR’s chain of hotels across Canada.

80 Years Ago: Revelstoke Review, June 17, 1938

An auto ferry service was in operation on the CPR line between Revelstoke and Golden, with autos carried on Trains No. 3 and 4. The rates started at $12.50 for automobiles with a wheel base of up to 115 inches. Travel trailers were also accepted for carriage as long as they were less than 6 feet, 6 inches in height, and less than 25 feet in length. Before the Big Bend Highway was completed in 1940, the trains were the only way to get cars between Revelstoke and Golden.

70 Years Ago: Revelstoke Review, June 17, 1948

Floodwaters were starting to recede, but travel throughout the region was still difficult. A report from 12 Mile noted that Ickey Kaduhr was boating people across the flooded area, sometimes taking up to 20 people in one load. Men who had to come into Revelstoke for work were “fording the nearly a mile of water in various states of undress.” Rail traffic on the mainline had resumed, but road and rail traffic was still out of service south of Revelstoke.

50 Years Ago: Revelstoke Review, June 13, 1968

A massive landslide came down at Camp Creek, 17 miles west of Revelstoke on June 5, killing four members of a family from Victoria. Ernest and Annette Bitterman were killed, along with two daughters, aged two and four.. A six year old daughter was thrown clear of the car and was found sitting near the slide crying, her face and clothing covered with mud. The slide was over 3,000 feet long and up to 600 feet wide and about 20 feet deep. It took out the bridge over the creek and swept it into Griffin Lake. One-way traffic was restored on Highway 1 three days later.

30 Years Ago: Revelstoke Review, June 15, 1988

Local historian Ruby Nobbs was elected to the board of directors of the BC Heritage Society. Nobbs was a founding member of the Revelstoke Historical Association, and manager of the Revelstoke Museum & Archives for many years. She wrote “History and Heritage” columns for the Revelstoke Review, and published a book under that title in 1998.

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