Revelstoke youth participate in Basin Youth Network 2018 Leadership Summit

  • May. 15, 2018 2:30 p.m.

“You’ve got the potential to make a real difference.”

“Dare to believe one day you might change the world.”

These are the kinds of messages youth received at the Basin Youth Network 2018 Leadership Summit.

Youth were invited to apply to participate in Columbia Basin Trust’s Basin Youth Network event that welcomed nearly 100 youth from 22 community youth networks in the region.

“Youth from Revelstoke really benefited by connecting with new people, creating new relationships and learning new skills. And as a coordinator, I always find the connections, brainstorming, idea sharing and storytelling at these events so inspiring,” said Leslie Hogg, youth liaison of Revelstoke’s Stoke Youth Network. “The Summit was able to ignite something in each of us that makes us want to bring youth in our community together. We now look forward to creating fun activities that all youth in Revelstoke can participate in.”

Ranging in age from 13 to 18, participants gathered in Kimberley from May 4 to 6 to develop their leadership skills, learn public speaking techniques, network and take part in other confidence-building activities.

They also benefited from an inspirational keynote from Rick Jensen, Chair of the Trust’s Board of Directors.

“Youth voice matters; that’s why we’re supporting communities to engage youth to be an active part of the conversations that matter to them,” said Aimee Ambrosone, Trust Director, Delivery of Benefits, in a news release. “Bringing youth together at the summit to build on their skills will help them develop personally and beyond as their ideas and enthusiasm find a stage in their communities.”

The Trust’s regional Basin Youth Network helps communities increase local activities and opportunities for youth, enabling them to learn skills like leadership and engage more with each other and their communities. With $4.55 million in funding over three years, the network has helped 28 communities form or continue local youth networks.

The trust has also helped develop local youth network coordinators to facilitate conversations that ensure youth priorities are identified and supported. Learn more at ourtrust.org/youthnetwork.

“The Basin Youth Network allows communities the time and stability to really engage with youth and allows them to lead program development so that it’s unique to their needs,” said Mike Kent, regional coordinator of the Basin Youth Network, in a news release. “This weekend was just one of many events the youth around the basin benefit from as part of this network. Our hope is that they take the confidence and energy they showcased during the summit back to their communities to inspire their peers and help create opportunities locally.”

In addition to learning about themselves and fellow youth, summit participants also learned more about their communities and the Ktunaxa people.

Youth received a welcome prayer from Ɂaq ̕am community member Bonnie Harvey, a welcome from Ktunaxa Nation Council Chair, Kathryn Teneese, watched a performance by the Adrumnik Drummers, participated in a workshop with the Ktunaxa Dance Troupe, and visited the Ktunaxa Interpretive Centre at St. Eugene Mission Resort, once a residential school for First Nations youth.

Columbia Basin Trust supports the ideas and efforts of the people in the Columbia Basin. To learn more about the Trust’s programs and initiatives, and how it helps deliver social, economic and environmental benefits to the Basin, visit ourtrust.org or call 1.800.505.8998.

 

Just Posted

CP vote deadline rescheduled for Friday

The deadline for the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference and International Brotherhood of… Continue reading

100 acts to make Revelstoke better in 1 day

June 2 will see all manner of activities for 100In1Day

Tourism Kelowna adopts sustainability initiative

Responsible to environment key to long-term tourism growth

Unicyclist stops in Revelstoke while heading across Canada

Taylor Stark took his first pedals atop a unicycle when he was… Continue reading

Okanagan Lake not rising as fast as before: River Forecast Centre

Similkameen River flood risk shifts to rainfall, not snowpack

Saw, chop and throw an axe at Timber Days in Revelstoke

Timber Days took over Centennial Park last Saturday!… Continue reading

Horgan defends fight to both retain and restrict Alberta oil imports

Alberta says pipeline bottlenecks are kneecapping the industry, costing millions of dollars a day

Vernon woman captures prestigious foresty honour

Tanya Wick from Tolko wins Women In Forest Award of Excellence

RCMP caution boaters after two kids pass out from carbon monoxide poisoning

Both children were given oxygen and taken to hospital

B.C. invests $115M to create 200 new nurse practitioner jobs

Health Minister says 780,000 B.C. residents don’t have a family doctor

Supreme Court rules social housing residents in B.C. deserve rights too

Tenants trying to stabilize their living situations should not face less legal rights than those paying market rates: Judge

Union calls on prime minister to step into ‘stalled’ Phoenix compensation talks

For more than two years, thousands of federal workers have been affected by Phoenix system

Judge: President Trump can’t block critics on Twitter

The judge had suggested that Trump mute rather than block some of his critics

NFL owners adopt new policy to address anthem protests

Commissioner Roger Goodell said the change was approved unanimously by owners

Most Read