The City of Revelstoke is considering revisiting its pesticide ban to allow use of pesticides to treat invasive species. The topic was discussed during a special council meeting on April 17. (File photo)

The City of Revelstoke is considering revisiting its pesticide ban to allow use of pesticides to treat invasive species. The topic was discussed during a special council meeting on April 17. (File photo)

City considers exemption to pesticide ban

In a brief special council meeting on April 17 the City approved a motion to consider a revision to pesticide use bylaw no.1988

A recommendation from the City of Revelstoke’s Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC) is prompting the City to consider an exemption to its ban of pesticide use.

In a brief special council meeting on April 17 the City approved a motion to consider a revision to pesticide use bylaw no. 1988 to allow the use of pesticides to treat invasive species.

But council denied a request to allow those with a residential applicator certificate to apply pesticides to their residential properties.

In a report to council from director of Engineering Mike Thomas dated April 6, Thomas wrote that the EAC is of the opinion that the pesticide use bylaw should not be amended to allow the use of pesticides by those who hold a B.C. Residential Applicator Certificate.

“Many municipalities have chosen to apply a bylaw to restrict the use of pesticides for cosmetic purposes and it’s the opinion of the EAC that it is a step backward in environmental stewardship to provide a means to allow for pesticide use for cosmetic purposes,” wrote Thomas.

A letter written to council in February from Geoff Wilson had called on the City to allow those with a BC Residential Applicator Certificate to apply legal pesticides to their property.

“In so doing the City might provide a safe path for honest homeowners who might otherwise be tempted to apply pesticides illegally,” wrote Wilson on Feb. 23.

Wilson called the bylaw, “difficult to enforce” and “frequently ignored.”

The pesticide use bylaw was implemented in 2011.

The bylaw was put in place prior to the development of the Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society. (CSIS)

The City’s Operations Manager Darren Komonoski is a member of CSIS.

Environmental sustainability coordinator Penny Page-Britton said in council chambers on April 17 that there is a need to treat invasive species.

Komonoski said pesticides could help treat invasive species like Japanese Knotweed.

The EAC is also recommending increased knowledge of the current pesticide ban and bylaw be circulated through the media.

@Jnsherman
jake.sherman@revelstokereview.com

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