St. Paul’s Foundation announces Scotiabank has donated $2 million to their youth transition program on May 14, 2019. From left to right, Fiona Dalton, CEO of Providence Health Care, Lesly Tayles, senior vice-president of B.C. and Yukon Scotiabank, Sierra Turner, patient of transition program, Dr. Jasmine Grewal, medical director of the Pacific Adult Congenital Heart Program, and Dick Vollet, president and CEO of St. Paul’s Foundation. (St. Paul’s)

$2-million donation to support youth transition care at St. Paul’s Hospital

The Scotiabank Youth Transition Program will expand existing programs

A $2-million donation to St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver will help support kids and teens with serious health issues who are moving from pediatric to adult care.

The Scotiabank Youth Transition Program was announced on Tuesday and will expand various programs at the hospital for young people across the province with a dedicated manager.

“Over the years and throughout varies admissions, the team at St. Paul’s has continued to walk alongside of me,” said Sierra Turner at the news conference. The 25-year-old has been a patient of the eating disorder program since she turned 18.

Dr. Jasmine Grewal, medical director of the Pacific Adult Congenital Heart Program, said the transition from pediatric to adult care can be a challenge for young people, especially those who have to bear the responsibilities of navigating appointments and travel expenses that may deter them from maintaining their health.

Each year, 300 new patients with congenital heart disease move from BC Children’s Hospital to her clinic as they turn 18.

“This gift will allow our incredible team at St. Paul’s to offer more workshops, mentorship, and resources – helping us to provide a more comprehensive wellness experience to youth during a challenging and pivotal time in their lives,” Grewal said.

READ MORE: St. Paul’s Hospital replacement slated to open in Vancouver in 2026

St. Paul’s is the provincial centre for highly-specialized programs relating to congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, kidney disease, organ transplants, substance use disorders and eating disorders.



joti.grewal@bpdigital.ca

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