Animal protection group urges B.C. vet association to ban cat declawing

Nova Scotia was the first Canadian province to ban declawing

The society that protects animal welfare in British Columbia is looking to the leadership of Nova Scotia’s veterinarians as it calls for a ban on feline declawing.

The B.C. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals wants the province’s college of veterinarians to declare declawing unethical — similar to a ban announced by the Nova Scotia Veterinary Medical Association last month.

READ: Little room for pets in current rental market

The society says it has been on record for nearly two decades as opposed to medically unnecessary procedures such as declawing, tail docking, ear cropping and devocalization.

Emilia Gordon, the society’s senior animal health manager, says veterinarians in B.C. care strongly about animal welfare and would welcome an opportunity to lead the way on the issue.

Nova Scotia was the first Canadian province to ban declawing, but a news release from the society says the practice is already prohibited in Australia, New Zealand, Israel, Brazil, the United Kingdom, many parts of Europe and some cities in California.

Gordon says studies show declawed cats are at higher risk for biting and aggression, are more likely to have trouble using the litter box, and have a significantly increased chance of back pain.

“Declawing a cat does not just remove the nails. It removes bones of the toes, comparable to amputating all of a human’s fingers at the last knuckle,” she says in the news release.

The Canadian Veterinary Medical Association released a position statement last year opposing feline declawing as an “ethically unacceptable” practice, Gordon says.

She believes a similar position by the College of Veterinarians of British Columbia would be a significant step forward in the humane treatment of animals in the province.

If a ban were imposed, anyone performing the practice and causing distress to an animal could face animal cruelty charges under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, the society says.

The Canadian Press


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past for May 22

120 Years Ago: Revelstoke Herald, May 20, 1899 Great improvements had been… Continue reading

Another climate rally scheduled for Friday in Revelstoke

Join students at City Hall to call for climate action

Roads and weather for Revelstoke today

No new fires in the Southeast Fire Centre

Revelstoke Community Calendar for May 22

Downhill Fiver Series May 26, 10 a.m. Get stoked for the 2019… Continue reading

Okanagan-Shuswap weather: rain, clouds, thunderstorms and flash floods

Environment Canada forecasts dreadful weather for Thursday

600 new campsites coming to provincial parks and recreation sites across B.C.

Tourism Minister announced half of the new spots to 13 most popular provincial parks

Raptors beat Bucks 105-99 to move within 1 game of NBA Finals

Leonard scores 35 as Toronto takes 3-2 series lead over Milwaukee

Okanagan housing builds hope for 52 homeless individuals

The 52 unit supported housing apartment officially opens in Vernon

Gardens plant hope for Okanagan residents who were once homeless

Turning Points, in collaberation with Briteland, bring square foot gardening to Blair Apartments

Municipalities protest after B.C. declares marijuana crops ‘farm use’

UBCM president seeks answers in letter to John Horgan government

RCMP set to patrol Okanagan lakes

Vernon-North Okanagan members will be on area waters helping keep boaters safe

Popular Peachland park reopens

Hardy Falls Regional Park has been closed from flood damage since 2017

Summerland students to raise voices in public speech competition

Public speaking component is included in high school English program

CMHC defends mortgage stress test changes amid calls for loosening rules

Uninsured borrowers must now show they could service their mortgage if rates rose two per cent

Most Read