Canada Post not stopping amid COVID-19, but changes made to package delivery

Signatures no longer requested for any at-door deliveries to eliminate need for scanners

Canada Post is continuing mail service but eliminating the use of scanners amid COVID-19 pandemic. (Langley Advance Times files)

Canada Post is continuing mail service but eliminating the use of scanners amid COVID-19 pandemic. (Langley Advance Times files)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat…” goes the United States Postal Service mantra. Now the coronavirus can also be added to that list – at least for Canada Post that is.

The mail service released a statement on March 15, stating the Crown corporation is following the direction of the Public Health Agency of Canada and continuing to introduce new safety measures to help contain the spread of COVID-19.

Regular mail delivery will continue, but new practises for special packages and letters have been implemented.

“To help minimize points of close contact in our communities,” the statement read, “we will no longer be requesting signatures for any deliveries to the door. This will eliminate the need for scanners and stylus pens to be passed back and forth during the delivery process of these items.

Instead, where possible, our delivery agents will apply our safe drop process. This means they will leave these items in your mailbox or outside your door if it’s safe to do so. Where it’s not possible to safe drop, our delivery agent will leave a notice card indicating the post office where you can pick up your items by showing proof of identity.

To receive the following items only: Registered, Xpresspost Certified, Proof of Identity, Proof of Age, COD (collect on delivery) and items where custom fees are due, please know that we cannot release these items unless a signature is provided.

You will receive a notice card indicating the post office where you can pick up your items by showing proof of identity and signing. If you are sick or under self-isolation, please arrange for someone to pick up these items in your place.”

READ MORE: Amazon seeks to hire 100,000 to keep up with surge in orders

Canada Post said any further updates will be delivered to the public as they are made available and further measured.

Updates and more information on mail delivery can be found at www.canadapost.ca.

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