A B.C. mountain caribou in winter. (Jim Lawrence photo)

A B.C. mountain caribou in winter. (Jim Lawrence photo)

Columbia-Shuswap governments promised voice in caribou recovery

Population of Frisby-Boulder herd northeast of Sicamous at 11 animals and declining

Ongoing consultation on B.C.’s mountain caribou preservation efforts has created some ease among local government officials concerned with potential impacts on tourism and recreation.

On Thursday, Sept. 19, the Columbia Shuswap Regional District board heard from some of the provincial employees working on implementing plans aimed at recovering the threatened Southern Mountain Caribou herds.

The presentation was led by Tami Kendall, a land and resource coordinator with the BC Caribou Recovery Team.

Kendall said as it works on plans to help the caribou, the province will be consulting with local governments and First Nations, as well as the stakeholders who rely on the areas the caribou call home for industry and recreation. She said local knowledge and the traditional ecological expertise of the First Nations are important information to be included in the document. The engagement process will run from January to March 2020.

After taking their strenuous objection to the lack of consultation on the issue of caribou recovery plans all the way to the Premier’s office, Sicamous and Revelstoke Mayors Terry Rysz and Gary Sulz told the board they are feeling more positive about the process now.

Read More: ‘I felt betrayed’: North-Okanagan Shuswap NDP candidate responds to Trudeau brownface photo

Read More: Vehicle thefts prompt plea from Salmon Arm RCMP

Sulz said he was assured advanced herd planning for 14 of the most at-risk herd in the province would begin in the fall and Revelstoke would get a seat at the table to discuss nearby herds from the start.

Rysz said things have come a long way from when conversations about the threatened caribou began in terms of public consultation. He said he remains concerned about backcountry being closed to recreation and industry as part of the herd recovery plans.

Kendall detailed how the 54 Caribou herds in the province have undergone a population decline from 40,000 to 19,000 animals since the early 1900s.

The Frisby-Boulder herd which ranges from northeast of Sicamous to the Revelstoke area has a population estimated at 11 animals and is still in decline. The largest herd in the area is the Columbia North herd ranging north of Seymour Arm with a population of 147 animals.

Actions that could possibly be taken to help the struggling caribou herds were discussed with the board. Kendall said habitat protection and restoration is being considered that could include measures to obstruct lines of site, making it more difficult for predators to hunt caribou. Also noted in Kendall’s presentation was management of recreation in caribou habitat, supplemental feeding and predator control. Kendall said maternal penning, which involves placing pregnant caribou cows in an enclosed space safe from predators until their newborn calves are old enough to move quickly and then turning them loose, is already being employed near Revelstoke and could be expanded in the future.

Read More: Shuswap Theatre reduces barriers with inclusive opening of Wizard of Oz

Read More: Lego robotics to woodworking 101 at Salmon Arm’s Innovation Centre


@SalmonArm
jim.elliot@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Downtown Revelstoke. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)
COVID slows in Revelstoke to 2 new cases

Data is from Jan. 17 to 23

Toronto’s Mass Vaccination Clinic is shown on Sunday January 17, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Interior Health reports 2 more deaths, 83 new COVID-19 cases

Health authority also identifies new virus cluster in Fernie

A moose and her calf attempting to cross the Jordan River June 22, 2020, as seen from the Jordan River trail. (Jocelyn Doll/Revelstoke Review)
Letter: One year later Jordan River area still at risk

A Revelstoke company is one year in to their two year temporary permit for exploration in the area

Kevin Dorrius, general manager at Community Futures Revelstoke, presents Revelstoke local Jane McNab with the Volunteer of the Year Award for Revelstoke. (Submitted)
Community Futures planning September conference

Final decisions will be made in July depending on the state of the pandemic and vaccinations

A pair of Okanagan Regional Library reference librarians have created a podcast called Hard Cover that takes a zany but informative look at books, libraries and librarians. (File photo)
Okanagan reference librarians produce quirky podcast

Davin Helkenberg and Peter Critchley are behind Hard Cover

British Columbia Health Minister Adrian Dix looks on as Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry addresses the media during a news conference at the BC Centre of Disease Control in Vancouver B.C. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)
B.C. announces 485 new COVID-19 cases, fewest deaths in months

‘The actions we take may seem small, but will have a big impact to stop the virus,” urges Dr. Henry

Crown prosecutors have stayed attempted murder charges against Kelowna’s Jesse Pez. (Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
Man accused in Kelowna Halloween stabbing has attempted murder charge stayed

The Crown only proceeds with charges when evidence provides ‘a substantial likelihood of conviction’

RCMP released this photo on Jan. 27, 2021 of Terrance Jones, 40, a Caucasian man with a closely shaved head, brown eyes, dirty blonde or brown hair, and a thin mustache and beard. The inside of his right arm is covered in tattoos, including one of a face. (Kamloops RCMP photo)
RCMP want public’s help to locate Shuswap man wanted on charge of attempted murder

Sicamous man was arrested previously on Jan. 11 for allegedly breaching conditions of release

Royal B.C. Museum conservator Megan Doxsey-Whitfield kneels next to a carved stone pillar believed to have significance as a First Nations cultural marker by local Indigenous people. The pillar was discovered on the beach at Dallas Road last summer. Museum curatorial staff have been working with Songhees and Esquimalt Nation representatives to gain a clearer picture of its use. (Photo courtesy Royal BC Museum)
Stone carving found on Victoria beach confirmed Indigenous ritual pillar

Discussion underway with the Esquimalt and Songhees about suitable final home for the artifact

Former Vancouver Giants forward Evander Kane is seen here in Game 7 of the second round of the 2009 WHL playoffs against the Spokane Chiefs (Sam Chan under Wikipedia Commons licence)
Gambling debts revealed in details of bankruptcy filing by hockey star Evander Kane

Sharks left winger and former Vancouver Giants player owes close to $30 million total

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Othman “Adam” Hamdan, pictured in front of Christina Lake’s Welcome Centre, was acquitted of terrorism related charges in 2017. He has been living in Christina Lake since November 2020. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Man acquitted on terrorism charges awaits deportation trial while living in Kootenays

Othman Ayed Hamdan said he wants to lead a normal life while he works on his upcoming book

B.C. Premier John Horgan wears a protective face mask to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 prior to being sworn in by The Honourable Janet Austin, Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia during a virtual swearing in ceremony in Victoria, Thursday, November 26, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Premier Horgan calls jumping COVID vaccine queue ‘un-Canadian’

Horgan says most people in B.C. are doing their best to follow current public health guidelines

Most Read