Do you know about the Ogopogo statue at the bottom of Okanagan Lake?

An 8 foot tall, 14 feet long statue has lived at the bottom of the lake bed since the early 1990s

An eight-foot tall, 14-foot long sea monster resides at the bottom of Okanagan lake.

It’s a life-size homage to the legendary N’ha-a-itk, better known to many as Ogopogo.

A statue of the legend resides 30 feet beneath the surface at Paul’s Tomb, to the left of the bay in Knox Mountain Park.

Doug Lundgren, office manager at Diving Dynamics, helped install the statue in the early 1990s with a team and the artist, who he says lived in the Pandosy neighbourhood.

“The statue is fantastic, we take scuba divers down there and the visibility is about 10 or 12 feet, they are looking down and all the sudden they see this green shadow and their eyes just become dinner plates,” said Lundgren.

“We got together a team of divers, towed it across the lake and slowly sank it and then anchored it to the bottom of the lake. One of our biggest concerns was boats putting anchors down and catching him, but that hasn’t happened yet.”

The Westbank First Nation describes N’ha-a-itk as a fierce lake monster that resided at Squally Point. The name wasn’t changed to Ogopogo until a British dance hall song, written in 1924 was composed. It is believed that the legendary N’ha-a-itk has a snake-like body of about 25 metres long, some say it looks like a horse, others say it looks like it’s reptilian or goat-like.

RELATED: Mermaids make a splash for lakes

The artist’s rendition of Ogopogo resembles the snake-like description.

The statue has been featured in Diving B.C. Lakes and Rivers by diver William M. Hall, who says it’s not the only treasure to be found in the depths of Okanagan Lake.

The statue of Ogopogo is nestled near a sunken power boat. Across the lake, at Wilson Landing, there is a submerged milk truck from what he estimates the 1950s. There is also a Canadian Pacific Railway barge 300 feet deep at Bear Creek Provincial Park, several underwater parks for divers, and for the experienced, they can follow the old ferry line across the lake and discover hidden treasures from years before.

“There are some neat things to see. My favourite thing in the Interior, not just the Okanagan but in the Kootenays as well, is the fact that back in the 1800s before there were roads and there were mining camps and a railhead north in Revelstoke and one in the south in the U.S. the only way to get up and down were the ribbon lakes or by donkey. As a result of that, throughout the lakes there are a lot of remnants of these barges they used from mining towns, small strips of railway, used barges and steamboats,” said Hall.

“You can find old sternwheelers, battle wheelers, steamboats, tugboats, barges they used to carry rail cars that fell off. In each old mining town, the water used to be the dumps and you can find artifacts that people threw away, that’s the part (of diving) that I like,” said Hall.

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@KelownaCapNews
newstips@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Just Posted

Revelstoke elementary school students create art for seniors

The inter-generational project sees Grade 5 students creating outdoor art at Moberly Manor

Rain in Sunday forecast for Okanagan-Shuswap

Environment Canada calling for 15-20 millimetres in regions

Severe thunderstorm watch in effect for Okanagan, Shuswap

Environment Canada is forecasting strong wind gusts, large hail and heavy downpours in parts of the Interior

WorkSafe BC conducted 70 inspections in the Okanagan amid B.C.’s reopening plan

WorkSafe BC has conducted 100 inspections at restaurants across the province since May 19

City hall refurbishment comes in nearly $500,000 over budget

Revelstoke City Council voted unanimously to move forward despite the increased cost

Kelowna councillor creates campaign to help small businesses, charity

Made In YLW aims to support local businesses affected by COVID-19

PHOTOS: Thousands gather at Vancouver Art Gallery to protest racism

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Number of students returning is a wild card as B.C. schools set to reopen Monday

A common model will see other teachers work four days a week in class then the fifth remotely,

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

‘I’m afraid’: Witnesses of wolf attack on senior near Prince Rupert worried about safety

Frank Russ shows where the unprovoked wolf attacked his father

PHOTOS: Okanagan residents capture epic lightning show

A look at some of the best shots of the storm on May 30

Big White Ski Resort to offer rebate for pass holders after early closure

Next year’s pass will include a 20 per cent rebate

‘No tick is a good tick’: Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation

The foundation’s president said all ticks that attach to humans and pets can carry various diseases

Protesters rally against anti-black, Indigenous racism in Toronto

Police estimated the crowd to be between 3,500 and 4,000 and said there was no violence

Most Read