A police officer Const. Ian Jordan in Victoria has died after spending 30 years in a coma following an on-duty car crash. Jordan was racing to the scene of a break-and-enter when his car collided with another police vehicle early on Sept. 22, 1987. THE CANADIA PRESS/HO-Victoria Police Department

Family, colleagues reflect on B.C. officer in a coma for 30 years

Hilary Jordan said her husband’s death on April 11 feels like deja vu

Victoria police Const. Ian Jordan died in hospital Wednesday after spending 30 years in a coma caused by his cruiser crashing into another police vehicle racing towards same call.

Retired Sgt. Ole Jorgensen vividly remembers the crash that sent his friend and colleague into a coma.

He was responding to a business alarm when Jordan’s vehicle crossed the intersection in front of him.

“I had my foot on the brake so hard and in my head I can distinctly remember I was saying, ‘Get out of the way Ian.’ But it was too late, it was a split second before I hit him that I realized he was there,” Jorgensen said.

Victoria Police said the accident resulted in the creation of a “trauma team,” which helps officers and staff after traumatic incidents, and also prompted a change in procedures for controlling traffic lights.

A funeral for Jordan with full police honours is being planned.

A full departmental funeral for Jordan has been scheduled for Thursday, April 19 at 2 p.m., at Christ Church Cathedral, 930 Burdett Ave.

RELATED: VicPD officer dies after 30 years in a coma

The officer was 35 at the time of the accident and father to a 16-month-old son.

Hilary Jordan said her husband’s death feels like deja vu.

“I feel like I’m back 30 years ago and it was just a new normal, 30 years visiting hospital every day. It’s just really part of my life now. So it just feels quite different,” she said.

“But I’m happy for Ian that his struggle is over and he’ll be at peace.”

Between the Jordan family and members of the department, she said “Ian, for 30 years, had a visit every day.”

She never remarried. Their son, Mark, is now criminal lawyer in Edmonton.

Jorgensen described Ian Jordan as a close friend who loved going on calls with him and his K-9 unit.

Earlier in their shift on Sept. 22, 1987, Jordan had been pushed down a flight of stairs when responding to a call at a nightclub, Jorgensen said, so he was supposed to be heading home.

But Jordan was a keen officer and when reports of a possible break-and-enter came in, Jorgensen said he must have decided to respond to the call instead.

In the three decades that Jordan was in a coma, Jorgensen said he visited every month. He would fill Jordan in on the goings-on of the police department — who got hired or fired — and update him on his wife and son.

“I would just tell him what was going on in our lives. Just in case. We don’t know whether he was hearing us, so, just in case (I was) keeping him up to date,” Jorgensen said.

He wasn’t alone. Police Chief Del Manak said several Victoria Police officers and staff members have visited Jordan on a regular basis, himself included.

“I found it quite humbling to be in his presence,” Manak said.

“Like most police departments, it’s a really tight-knit family. It’s a group of individuals who are committed to serving their community. This hits home the risks and dangers that our officers and staff face, who work the front lines.”

Manak said it’s hard to imagine what the family has experienced. Jordan made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty and Manak said the department is consulting his family as it plans a memorial service.

“We want to make sure that there is closure, but that it’s done in a way that respects the sacrifice that Ian has made,” Manak said.

The Canadian Press

Just Posted

Open burning permitted again in Kamloops Fire Centre

Low fire rating prompts decision throughout Kamloops Fire Centre

B.C. Rural Party co-founder rebukes pro-NDP accusation

Telkwa Mayor Darcy Repen disputes being NDP campaign supporter

Juno nominated artist performing at LUNA in Revelstoke Sept. 29

Cris Derksen is an Indigenous cellist and was nominated for her album Orchestral Powwow

Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past for Sept.

120 Years Ago: Revelstoke Herald, September 17, 1898 A freight boat that… Continue reading

Covered in mud at the Revelstoke Women’s Enduro

108 women rode in the annual Revelstoke Women’s Enduro race on Saturday.… Continue reading

Weekday weather update

The rain moves in right across the Okanagan-Shuswap valley

Recent jump in U.S. butter imports? All smooth, says Canadian dairy farmers

U.S. farmers recently enjoyed extra access to the Canadian market

Potential replacements for Phoenix pay system to start testing soon: Brison

Testing of prototypes to replace troubled federal pay system will begin within weeks

Nanaimo’s Tilray Inc. briefly the world’s largest cannabis company

The company, only listed in the US, nearly reached $300 in afternoon trading on Wednesday

Woman who helped kidnap Elizabeth Smart released from prison

Smart was 14 years old when she was snatched from her Salt Lake City home in 2002 by street preacher Brian David Mitchell

New York books editor out after backlash over Jian Ghomeshi essay

Ian Buruma, who was appointed as editor of the New York Review of Books in late 2017, no longer works for the publication

B.C. couple plans sustainable, zero-waste life in the Shuswap

Plan includes building a tiny house before the snow flies

Housing slowdown forecast to cool B.C. economy

Conference Board says pipeline, trade uncertainty affecting investment

B.C. hockey product eyes shot at Olympic spot with China

Fletcher is one of 24 who travelled to Shenzhen, China for the first official Olympic dev camp.

Most Read