Four things ‘not’ to do if you run into Prince Harry and Meghan in B.C.

Like many in British Columbia, you may be worried about running into Prince Harry and Meghan in your local dairy aisle, and not knowing how to behave properly.

Here are some things you definitely should NOT do, according to the BBC.

• Don’t touch them. Traditionally one may only touch a Royal if a hand is offered.

• Don’t ask for an autograph. Members of the royal family aren’t supposed to sign autographs out of worry they could be forged.

• Don’t ask for a selfie. Taking a selfie would require turning your back to a Royal and that’s a no-no.

Finally, the BBC is also reporting the couple is considering an invasion of privacy suit against a paparazzi photographer who snapped Meghan and Archie out for a walk with their two dogs in Horth Hill Regional Park on Vancouver island, Monday morning.

With that in mind, you probably don’t want to take their picture, either.

Curtsies are not required, nor expected, when meeting a Royal, but they are not out-of-line. A Government of Canada website with information on royal conduct describes an acceptable curtsy – should the spirit move you – as the right foot placed behind the left heel, with the knees bent slightly. Men may make neck bows, which are just a little more than a nod of the head.

While Harry is still a prince, neither he nor Meghan are to be addressed as Royal Highness. (They do retain the titles, however.) They are called Duke and Duchess of Sussex and subsequently “Sir” and “Ma’am”.

While the couple doesn’t ordinarily use last names, if you get stuck you could probably just refer to them as Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor’s mom and dad.

Related: Anti-tax group calls for no federal funds for Prince Harry, Meghan Markle while in Canada

Related: Harry and Meghan can ‘live a little less formal’ in Canada, says Monarchist League

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

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