FILE – People walk past large letters spelling out UBC at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., on November 22, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Many B.C. post-secondary institutions say fall classes will be offered mostly online

Most campuses closed in March due to COVID-19

Many B.C. post-secondary institutions will lean towards online classes for the fall semester in an attempt to keep up with physical distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Post-secondary institutions throughout the country had largely closed their campuses and shifted online in March once COVID-19 made in-person classes impossible.

In a statement released Monday, the University of B.C. said it will offer “larger classes online with selected smaller classes conducted in-person” for the fall semester. The smaller in-person classes will adhere to physical distancing guidelines, president Santa J. Ono said, while online classes will allow for international students who cannot get into Canada in time for the term to begin.

In a message from Simon Fraser University, vice-president of academics Jonathan Driver said that “most classes will continue to be delivered through remote methods.” Some laboratory-based classes, field trips, and graduate student classes will be offered in person.

In a statement, Kwantlen Polytechnic University said it is planning for the fall semester but “it is too early to talk about those plans.”

University of Victoria president Jamie Cassels said classes will be offered “predominantly online” in the fall, although some services and necessary classes will return to campus with physical distancing measures. Nanaimo’s Vancouver Island University said it will go to a “hybrid program delivery model” for the fall semester, combining both face-to-face and online classes.

Langara College said classes that can be offered remotely will remain online for fall, while course that necessitate face-to-face instruction will be offered on campus.

In a statement, Thompson Rivers University said it would hold on-campus classes “responsibly with face-to-face course delivery where possible,” and remote learning will continue for the rest of the curriculum.

The University of the Fraser Valley said more updates are to come but that “alternate forms of delivery” will continue for many classes during the fall semester.

Up north, the University of Northern B.C. said most classes will be offered remotely. In the Kootenays, Selkirk College said fall course delivery will depend on multiple factors.

“Each will have specific exposure control plans in place to achieve physical distancing, hygiene, new requirements for personal protective equipment and cleaning regimes,” a statement on the college website said.

READ MORE: B.C. universities opt out of in-person spring graduation ceremonies


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

CoronavirusPost-secondary EducationUniversities and Colleges

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Revelstoke City Council approves replacement of $160,000 snow removal machine

It is one of three scheduled to be replaced over the next five years

Revelstoke could further delay byelection to save funds

It’s been roughly eight months since Steven Cross left city council

Nine new COVID-19 cases announced in Interior Health region

The total number of cases since the pandemic started is now at 531 for the region

Revelstoke Chamber of Commerce celebrates 125 years

The organization has outlasted 16 Canadian prime ministers

Netflix star Francesca Farago seen hanging in the Okanagan

Farago got her big break as a reality TV star in Netflix’s ‘Too Hot to Handle’ in 2020

105 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death as health officials urge B.C. to remember safety protocols

There are currently 1268 active cases, with 3,337 people under public health monitoring

U.S. Presidential Debate Takeaways: An acrid tone from the opening minute

Here are key takeaways from the first of three scheduled presidential debates before Election Day on Nov. 3

Peachland resident finds severed bear paw on driveway

Tracie Gordon thought it was a Halloween prank, but it turned out to be a real bear paw

B.C. nurses report rise in depression, anxiety, exhaustion due to pandemic

A new UBC study looks into how the COVID-19 response has impacted frontline nurses

National child-care plan could help Canada rebound from COVID-induced economic crisis: prof

A $2 billion investment this year could help parents during second wave of pandemic

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Search suspended for Indigenous elder last seen mushroom picking in northwest B.C.

Mushroom picker Thomas (Tommy) Dennis has been missing since Sept. 16

16 MLAs retiring from B.C. politics add up to $20M in pensions: Taxpayers Federation

Taxpayers pay $4 for every dollar MLAs contribute to their pensions

‘Bonnie’ and ‘Henry’ among latest litter of service dog puppies

B.C. Alberta Guide Dogs names two pups after provincial health officer

Most Read