Brig.-Gen. Mark Misener speaks after taking command of the Canadian Armed Forces Transition Group during a parade in Ottawa, Monday December 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Military closes book on oft-criticized support unit for ill, injured troops

The transition unit will provide support and services to military members struggling with physical and mental injuries so they can return to work.

The Canadian military is closing the book on an oft-criticized unit for ill and injured troops as it promises to better care for personnel when they leave the Forces.

The Joint Personnel Support Unit was effectively replaced in an elaborate military ceremony this morning with a new transition unit that top brass hope will solve some of the Forces’ most pressing human-resources problems.

The transition unit will provide support and services to military members struggling with physical and mental injuries so they can return to work — or begin the often emotionally difficult process of leaving the Forces.

The previous support unit was set up during the height of war in Afghanistan for exactly that purpose, but significant staff shortages, a lack of training and other deficiencies resulted in years of complaints.

Transition unit commander Brig.-Gen. Mark Misener says he is confident he now has the staff and resources necessary to provide the support that injured service members need.

The new transition unit’s job will also include making sure sick and injured service members don’t fall through the cracks when they leave the military, which has been another source of concern over the years.

Read more: Canadian military’s template for perfect recruits outdated: Vance

Read more: Will legalized marijuana impact the Canadian military?

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