Ombudsperson to review drug researcher firings

Jay Chalke's office exempted from confidentiality agreements, NDP agrees to his independent probe into reason for dismissals

B.C. Ombudsperson Jay Chalke

B.C.’s new Ombudsperson has been given extra authority to investigate the case of eight ministry of health researchers whose work on drug effectiveness was terminated three years ago.

The B.C. government passed amendments Tuesday to allow Ombudsperson Jay Chalke to review the case that has had the government on the defensive since the abrupt dismissal of university researchers in 2012.

The researchers were assessing drugs for eligibility under the province’s Pharmacare program. The health ministry initially said a confidential database of B.C. patients who had taken various drugs had been misused, and some of the researchers appeared to have conflicts of interest.

One fired contractor committed suicide, another is suing the government for wrongful dismissal and the remainder have been paid confidential settlements and reinstated. The government has since apologized for the way the contractors were treated, but reasons for the firings and why they were reversed have not been made clear.

Chalke, a former public trustee appointed Ombudsperson this spring, said he would take the case if confidentiality agreements didn’t prevent him from reviewing documents and getting answers from those involved.

Attorney General Suzanne Anton presented changes to the Ombudsperson Act to exempt the office from confidentiality agreements for this case, and the changes passed the legislature with unanimous consent in under an hour Tuesday.

After an independent labour lawyer was unable to compel testimony from senior health ministry officials, Premier Christy Clark rejected opposition calls for an independent inquiry.

Health Minister Terry Lake referred the issue to the Ombudsperson, and NDP critics agreed to the move after changes were made to give Chalke the authority he needs.

 

Just Posted

What is wilderness?

A few years ago I asked a question on my Facebook page,… Continue reading

Glimpses of our past for Feb. 20

125 Years Ago: Kootenay Star, Feb. 24, 1894 A concert entertainment was… Continue reading

Stoked on Science: Deep in the Polar Vortex

Jade Harvey Special to the Review Sounds like science fiction doesn’t it?… Continue reading

Okanagan film industry brings in $32 million

Business is brisk in the Okanagan

Mermen calendar targets ‘toxic masculinity,’ raises big money for charities

Newfoundland and Labrador Beard and Moustache Club gave a cheque for more than $202,000 to Violence Prevention NL

Missing hiker not seen by rescuers after team rescues friend near Vancouver

The rescuers were able to rescue the missing man’s friend

Minister says plans to fight poverty, climate change, focus of B.C. budget

The NDP said in its throne speech last week that affordability will be the hallmark of its initiatives

UPDATED: ‘Violent’ B.C. man back in custody after Alberta arrest

Prince George man with ties to Vernon was being sought by police

After a week away, SNC-Lavalin questions await MPs returning to Parliament

Two have resigned already: Jody Wilson-Raybould was veterans affairs minister and Gerald Butts was Trudeau’s principal secretary

‘How did we get here?’: B.C. mom of transplant recipient worries about measles outbreaks

Addison, 7, cannot get a live vaccine because she has a heart transplant

Poverty coalition has high hopes for B.C. poverty reduction strategy

Funding allocation expected to be released with 2019 budget

Chanel: Iconic couturier Karl Lagerfeld has died

He spent virtually his entire career at luxury labels catering to the very wealthy

Interior Health on high alert for possible measles cases

No reports of the disease yet, but regular travel to the Coast could bring measles to the Interior

Most Read