Parts of the TCT through Princeton will open to motorized vehicles Monday

Parts of the TCT through Princeton will open to motorized vehicles Monday

Parts of the KVR trail through Princeton will open for motorized vehicles Monday June 1, at 3 p.m.

“It has been almost four years that our clubs have worked together, petitioning, raising funds and lobbying to get this partial opening,” said Ed Vermette, president of the Princeton ATV Club.

According to CAO Lyle Thomas, town staff will start Monday morning erecting signage along the trail explaining rules and etiquette.

“We are excited about it,” he said.

Use of the KVR in town has been a contentious issue, following a bylaw passed in 2016 banning motorized vehicles.

Related: Council passes controversial ATV ban

A re-opening of the trail was a major discussion during the 2018 election, and striking a committee to make recommendations in mixed use was one of the new council’s first actions.

“It feels good to see the co-operation and the work that was done to get where we are,” said Mayor Spencer Coyne.

Related: Princeton council strikes committee to explore motorized vehicles on the KVR

The trail will be open to registered and insured off road vehicle riders from the east to Twin Rivers Park, across from the Bridge of Dreams, where there will be a staging area.

The west end of the trail through the tunnel will be open up to, but not past Subway Restaurant. A staging area is provided near the Princeton Dog Park.

At this time there can be no passage through town on the trail as the province has refused to give the municipality permission to continue underneath the bridge crossing Highway 3.

The Princeton ATV Club, and the Similkameen Valley Riders, raised funds to pay for the KVR’s new signage, headed.

“It would be easy for the motorized taxpayers to complain that our tax payer dollars were used to keep us off it. But this is important to our community businesses and enthusiasts, therefore we chose to raise funds for this project.”

The trail will be open for one year, as a trial.

Thomas said the municipality will collect feedback so council can address the issue again in 2021.

“We are not anticipating a problem.”

Vermette is urging all users to be respectful.

“Please use the trail responsibly, read the signs and follow the rules. It is up to each of us to prove we can be responsible sharing the trail with all users. Working together and following the rules during the trial period will help our clubs to continue lobbying for a complete trail right through town.”

Related: MLA throws full support behind shared use trails

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andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

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