Report recommends five conditions for new Revelstoke gravel pit permit

Conditions include dust control plan, crystalline silica study and noise controls.

The City of Revelstoke is asking for dust control measures on a proposed new gravel pit off Westside Road.

The City of Revelstoke is asking for dust control measures on a proposed new gravel pit off Westside Road.

The City of Revelstoke is asking the province impose four conditions on a proposed new gravel pit up Westside Road, including a study on the amount of crystalline silica the pit will produce and the potential public health impacts.

The conditions are recommended by Dean Strachan, the city’s manager of development services, in a report to council.

They are in response to an application by Revelstoke Sand & Gravel to build a new gravel pit off Westside Road across the Columbia River from the Revelstoke Golf Club.

Revelstoke Sand & Gravel is being asked to have a registered professional biologist prepare a report on any “streams, water courses or other features requiring reporting to Federal and Provincial Agencies” before a city development permit is issued.

A second recommendation asks the province to impose four conditions on the gravel pit should it grant a land tenure to the applicant.

The first is to put in place a dust management plan that identifies sources of dust and methods of mitigation and control.

The second is to conduct a study that identifies the amount of crystalline silica that would be produced, as well as mitigation measures to address any public health concerns.

The third condition is for a noise control plan. The fourth is to limit the hours of operation to 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Monday to Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday.

The requests follow a presentation by gravel pit opponent Stuart Andrews at the last meeting of council. He raised concerns about the health impacts of crystalline silica dust emanating from other gravel pits in the area, as well as noise issues.

The staff report is accompanied by a letter from Carl Rankin, the designated agent for Revelstoke Sand & Gravel, saying the pit will have far less impact than the neighbouring Interroute quarry.

The letter says the pit will see less use, will be developed in stages and that a tree buffer will mitigate any dust concerns.

“It is our professional opinion that our proposed RSG operations would never present an external dust problem, and we do not require a dust mitigation protocol,” the letter states.

Council will discuss the staff recommendations on Tuesday, Sept. 8.