A CP Rail worker stands nearby an idling train at Revelstoke.

Revelstoke mayor awaits details of rail safety disclosure rules

New hazardous materials railway disclosure rules are a step in the right direction, mayor says, but the devil will be in the details

Revelstoke Mayor David Raven says new federal rules that require rail companies to disclose hazardous cargos to municipalities are a step in the right direction, but more details are needed.

“The devil is always in the details,” Raven said following the Nov. 20 announcement from the federal Ministry of Transportation, which requires rail companies to disclose the nature and volume of dangerous goods to municipalities on an annual basis.

Rail companies will also be required to list in their annual reports quarterly breakdowns of hazardous materials shipped.

Critics called for more detailed disclosures; the Revelstoke mayor said city leaders will have to wait and see how the system works.

“Because you are on the CPR mainline, you can pretty much assume everything goes through here,” Raven noted.

He said the city’s emergency preparedness program and fire department were well-prepared to deal with rail emergencies – such as the fire on the rail bridge over the Columbia River in May of 2013.

However, any municipality of our size would struggle to deal with a large-scale disaster, such as the July Lac-Mégantic derailment, that killed 47 and devastated the Quebec town’s core with explosions and fire.

“How do you prepare for that? So quick and so devastating,” Raven said. “You prepare for the extent that you can, but you can’t, because of the nature of what’s going across the railways, it’s hard to be prepared for every conceivable emergency.”

Raven said, in his opinion, dangerous goods transportation on the Trans-Canada Highway was “of even greater concern.”

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) represents municipal governments at the federal level. The organization pushed for changes to disclosure rules following the Lac-Mégantic derailment disaster.

FCM president Claude Dauphin welcomed the new rules:

“It sends a clear message that the Government of Canada fully agrees that local governments need to know basic information about dangerous goods being transported through their communities. The Lac-Mégantic tragedy, and recent derailments in other parts of the country, have underscored the critical role that municipalities play in planning for and responding to rail emergencies involving dangerous goods.”

 

Just Posted

City of Revelstoke company owes millions

With the proposed propane subsidy, mayor said RCEC won’t be able to compete

Mixed responses to proposed propane subsidy in Revelstoke

FortisBC is proposing an amalgamation of propane and natural gas rates

In/vertigo shooting second video at Traverse Nov. 21

The band is performing the first show of the season

Revelstoke man who sexually assaulted drunk woman sentenced to 18 months house arrest

For the first nine months he cannot leave his home between 2 p.m. and 11 a.m. except for work

Clearing today in Revelstoke

High three degrees

B.C. politicians view supermodel’s transition journey on Transgender Day

Liberal MLA Jane Thornthwaite and New Democrat MLA Spencer Chandra Herbert appear in the documentary

John Mann, singer and songwriter of group Spirit of the West dead at 57

Mann died peacefully in Vancouver on Wednesday from early onset Alzheimer’s

VIDEO: B.C. high school’s turf closed indefinitely as plastic blades pollute waterway

Greater Victoria resident stumbles on plastic contamination from Oak Bay High

B.C. mayor urges premier to tweak road speeds in an ‘epidemic of road crash fatalities’

Haynes cites ICBC and provincial documents in letter to John Horgan

Hergott: Day of remembrance for road traffic victims

Lawyer Paul Hergott’s latest column

South Cariboo Driver hits four cows due to fog

The RCMP’s investigation is ongoing

Kamloops RCMP seek driver who hit teenager, then drove away

The 13-year-old boy was in a crosswalk, crossing Seymour Street at Eighth Avenue

City of Kelowna implements two new electric vehicle charging stations

EV drivers will now have four charging options across the city

B.C. won’t appeal decision protecting ICBC court experts

Change to evidence rules next to save money, David Eby says

Most Read