Interior Health says members of the public should protect themselves as local skies fill with smoke from wildfires. —Capital News file

Smoky skies means stay inside, according to Interior Health

The air quality in the Okanagan is considered a high risk

Wildfires across the province have resulted in smoky skies and poor air quality for many Interior Health communities. During times of poor air quality, it’s important that individuals take steps to protect their health and well being. Over the last week we have received questions from community members and local organizations about the health risks of strenuous outdoor activities.

In B.C. we use the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) to make recommendations for modifying outdoor activity and/or avoiding smoke.

Related: Flights from Kelowna International Airport affected by wildfire smoke

This index takes into consideration levels of particulate matter, NO2, SO2, and other gases that are known to negatively impact lung capacity, heart function, and blood flow to muscles and brain tissue. Smoke affects everyone differently, but those most at risk include individuals with underlying medical conditions such as asthma, COPD, heart disease, or diabetes, and infants, the elderly and pregnant women.

Related: Gottfriedsen Mountain wildfire continues to be held

The best way to protect your health when skies are smoky is to reduce your exposure and seek cleaner air. When the AQHI is moderate or higher (equal to and/or above 4), Interior Health recommends that individuals consider reducing or avoiding strenuous activities, and follow the recommendations provided on the BC Air Quality website.

If you are experiencing clinical symptoms of any kind, contact your health care provider or local walk-in clinic. If your symptoms are severe, seek emergency medical attention.

In the Central Okanagan, North Okanagan and South Okanagan the AQHI is currently 10+, ranked at a very high risk.

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@KelownaCapNews
newstips@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

CSRD wants immediate Provincial action to fund Newsome Creek study

Erosion along the creek is causing hazardous situation for residents

Revelstoke couple convert 9/11 ambulance into a traveling home

They plan to drive it to Mexico and beyond

Avalanche Canada in desperate need of funding

The organisation provides avalanche forecasting for an area larger than the United Kingdom

CSRD wants immediate Provincial action to fund Newsome Creek study

Erosion along the creek is causing hazardous situation for residents

Saving salmon: B.C. business man believes hatcheries can help bring back the fish

Tony Allard worked with a central coast First Nation to enhance salmon stocks

B.C. asking for tips on ‘dirty money’ in horse racing, real estate, luxury cars

Action follows a Peter German report on money laundering in B.C. casinos

Canadian dead more than a week after plane crash in Guyana: Global Affairs

Global Affairs said it couldn’t provide further details on the identity of the Canadian citizen

Children between 6 and 9 eligible for $1,200 RESP grant from province

BC Ministry of Education is reminding residents to apply before the deadline

Victoria spent $30,000 to remove John A. Macdonald statue

Contentious decision sparked controversy, apology from mayor

South region forestry workers nearly in legal strike position

Talks broke down between USW and IFLRA, resulting in booking out of provincial mediator

Privacy concerns over credit card use for legal online pot purchases

Worries follow privacy breaches at some Canadian cannabis retailers

NEB approves operating pressure increase to repaired Enbridge pipeline

The pipeline burst outside of Prince George on Oct. 9, now operating at 85 per cent

B.C. VIEWS: Setting speed limits in a post-fact political environment

Media prefer ‘speed kills’ narrative, even when it fails to appear

Most Read