Will the sun finally reveal itself this month? That's a strong likelihood says an Environment Canada meteorologist.

Will the sun finally reveal itself this month? That's a strong likelihood says an Environment Canada meteorologist.

Summer to finally come this month: meteorologist

Revelstoke experienced nearly double the average monthly rainfall last month, according to Environment Canada.

Revelstoke experienced nearly double the average monthly rainfall last month, according to Environment Canada.

146.3 millimetres of rain fell in June, just about double the historical average of 73.3mm. As well, the average temperature of 14.3 C was nearly two degrees below normal of 16.1 C, and the average high of 19 C was more than three degrees below normal.

The good news? July is forecast to be warmer than normal, said Environment Canada meteorologist Doug Lundquist.

“The one month forecast for July is looking like it will be a high probability it will be above average for temperature,” he told the Times Review, adding that the rain should let up as well. “We’ll still get showers and thunder storms but not the kind of extreme rainfall you’ve had.”

The cool weather and heavy rainfall last moth was the result of a series of upper low-pressure systems that set up regularly over B.C. “For the Interior it’s the season of the upper low-pressure systems and a lot of rain, so it’s typical for this time of year,” said Lundquist. “We’ve just had a few more than usual crossing the southern part of the province.”

The rain caused major floods in many parts of the province, landslides resulted in several closures of the Trans-Canada Highway near Revelstoke, and caused BC Hydro to spill water from the Revelstoke Dam to relieve pressure on the Lake Revelstoke reservoir.

In a special notice sent out last week, BC Hydro reported that high inflows from the rain caused water levels on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir to reach 439.1 metres – only one metre below normal full pool of 440.1 metres and 1.6 metres below maximum full pool of 440.7 metres.

BC Hydro said reservoir levels could be raised above normal full pool if rain continues and to avoid flooding downstream at Castlegar and Trail.  Spilling at the Revelstoke Dam is also likely to continue, but usually overnight and on weekends when demand is low.