PROPOSED BUDGET The municipality of Summerland’s proposed budget for $2020 is for $16,382,355 to cover the various costs of services provided by the municipality. (John Arendt/Summerland Review)

Summerland’s proposed budget requires $16,382,355

2020 budget is nearly half a million higher than the 2019 municipal budget of $15,905,410

Summerland’s proposed budget for 2020 calls for $16,382,355 to provide municipal services, pay debt charges and bolster municipal reserves.

The budget is nearly half a million higher than the 2019 municipal budget of $15,905,410.

The 2020 budget covers the costs of services provided by the municipality.

These include general government at $1,920,563, protective services at $3,077,998, works at $3,065,541, garbage and recycling services at $1,942,714, development services at $1,075,951, cemetery services at $106,014 and recreational and cultural services at $2,930,707.

READ ALSO: Summerland taxes expected to rise by 4.0%

READ ALSO: Assessment value increases do not correlate with higher taxes, says Municipality

The budget also includes debt charges of $550,749, transfer to capital of $15,000 and transfer to reserves of $1,697,118.

Several contractual and legislative increases will affect the budget.

Human resource contracts and benefits will increase by $132,113, RCMP contractual increases will add $82,253, garbage collection and landfill scale contract increases account for $69,448, software licensing fee increases will add $24,336, insurance premium increases will account for $23,690 and other contractual increases will add $9,500.

A 1.0 per cent tax increase would add $87,093 to municipal coffers.

However, changes to the property tax roll, such as property class changes, additions or deletions and new construction or demolitions will add roughly $144,633 in tax revenue for this year.

The biggest source of revenue for the municipality will be taxation, which accounts for just over 58 per cent of the total revenue.

Taxes will bring in $9,523,188.

Some of the other sources of revenue include sales of services and rentals, which are expected to bring in $2,895,809; provincial government grants worth $891,992; grants in lieu of taxes worth $144,970; licenses, permits and fines of $632,886 and transfers from surplus and reserve funds, estimated at $515,810.

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