Updated: Squamish resort that is backed by owners of Revelstoke Mountain Resort given environmental certificate

Garibaldi at Squamish resort being backed by Northland Properties, owners of Revelstoke Mountain Resort.

A proposed resort west of Garibaldi Provincial Park would be the latest addition to existing mountain resorts along the Sea to Sky Highway.

The B.C. government has issued an environmental assessment certificate for Garibaldi at Squamish mountain resort, proposed as a major competitor for North Shore ski hills and Whistler-Blackcomb resort.

The resort is being backed by two of the province’s biggest companies — the Aquilini Group, which owns the Vancouver Canucks and a large real estate portfolio; and Northland Properties, the owner of Revelstoke Mountain Resort.

Graham Rennie, the president of Northland Asset Management, the division that operates RMR, said that Northland is a shareholder in Garibaldi at Squamish, but is not directly involved in its development. He said GAS would not affect the company’s involvement in RMR.

“We own and operate RMR, it’s very important to us,” he said. “It’s a prime asset that we hope to see long-term into the future.”

The project has faced strong commercial and environmental opposition over 15 years, and the approval comes with 40 conditions and cautions about its impacts to the area.

The Squamish Nation is a partner in the Garibaldi project, which proposes expansion over 25 years to a 22,000-bed year-round resort village on Brohm Ridge near Squamish. It includes 23 ski lifts and 124 developed ski trails, scaled down from the original plan that included two golf courses and more housing.

Squamish Nation Chief Ian Campbell said the certificate is the first step in getting the project going, and more approvals will be needed from his council and the province.

“Squamish Nation will obtain a licence over a wilderness area that will be equal in size to the project area to practise its aboriginal rights,” Campbell said in a statement. “Although the project is controversial, Squamish Nation is comfortable that its cultural and environmental interests have been protected and that it will share appropriately in the economic benefits of the project.”

In issuing the certificate, Environment Minister Mary Polak and Forests Minister Steve Thomson noted that the proponents made significant changes during environmental assessment. They include changing the water supply from Brohm River surface water to groundwater, as well as removing golf courses and housing near Cat and Brohm Lakes, which are popular recreation lakes for Squamish residents.

Whistler council has lobbied the B.C. government to reject the project, arguing it would take business away from existing resorts, rather than draw more skiers in a “cluster effect” as argued by its proponents.

The Federation of Mountain Clubs of B.C. has also opposed the development, suggesting it may result in a move to expand into Garibaldi Park, as was the case with the Whistler-Blackcomb expansion.

With files from Alex Cooper, Revelstoke Review

 

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