The Grand Forks Fall Fair is welcoming submissions for two cannabis categories this year. (Photo from Grand Forks Fall Fair)

Weeding out the competition: Grand Forks to host cannabis contest at fall fair

Mayor to be among judges evaluating look, smell and ‘burnability’

Fall fairs are known for chilli cook-offs and apple pie contests – but one Kootenay city has added a “budding” new category for its local growers.

Canada’s latest legal crop will have two categories of its own next month at the 109th Grand Forks & District Fall Fair, where cannabis will be scrutinized, inspected and maybe even burned “if necessary,” according to a news release from organizers.

“Cannabis has been growing in the Boundary area for decades by licensed producers and many backyard enthusiasts,” the release reads. “The time has come to recognize the horticultural skills it takes to do this well.”

The fair will host separate categories for bud grown indoors and outdoors.

RELATED: Cannabis company set to plant in Rock Creek

Entries will be judged based on their look, smell and how well they smoulder, after being publicly displayed in tightly sealed glass jars “to control the smell.”

Local growers can submit between three and five grams’ worth of dried cannabis flower to be judged.

Among the judges will be Grand Forks mayor Brian Taylor, who has advocated for Grand Forks to become a “cannabis-friendly” community during his tenure.

“We need to recognize cannabis as another viable agricultural product,” said The Cannabis Party of Canada co-founder.

As far as judging goes, Taylor brings decades of experience. “I think my 25 years with cannabis makes me credible [as a judge],” he said.

In the controlled burning test, he said, judges will watch to see that the cannabis does not blacken. Along with the smell and look categories, Taylor said that it should make for a well-rounded evaluation, noting that the judges will stop short of smoking up.

“We’re not going to smoke a joint and see if it gets us stoned,” he said.

Organizers made it clear that the judging – including the burning portion – will take place off-site in an area “not regulated by smoking bylaws.” They also said that local RCMP are supportive of the initiative.

The fall fair runs Sept. 7 to 8 in Grand Forks.


@jensenedw
Jensen.edwards@grandforksgazette.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Approved: Stoked Living development on Hay Rd. will move forward

Revelstoke City Council voted in favour of zoning and OCP amendments required for the project

Two candidates declared for Columbia River Revelstoke

Incumbent Doug Clovechok (BC Liberal) and NDP candidate Nicole Cherlet; nominations close Oct. 2

Okanagan College expands ‘Wellness Wednesdays’ to all students this fall

Wellness Wednesday workshops are designed to be psycho-educational

Reach a Reader campaign hits milestone anniversary

The fundraiser will be more focused online this year

B.C. reports 96 new COVID-19 cases, one hospital outbreak

61 people in hospital as summer ends with election

Grand jury indicts police officer in Breonna Taylor death

Officer Brett Hankison was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment

Grizzly bear spotted in North Okanagan

Two residents warn of sightings in the area

RCMP investigating man reportedly hiking nude on Summerland’s Full Frontal trail

Potential charges against the man could include indecent exposure.

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

First 8 months of fatal overdoses in B.C. have now exceeded 2019 death toll

Nine people died every two days in August, BC Coroners Service data shows

Kelowna resident searching for ferret that went missing from beach

Dexter the Ferret is smaller than average and likes to chase squirrels

Refresh of Liberal government’s agenda comes amid new looming COVID-19 crisis

Lockdowns saw fed spending soar to historic levels in effort to offset pandemic’s blow to Canadians’ livelihoods

Most Read