(REview File photo) That Statement of Financial Information from the city and the regional district has been submitted to the Ministry of Finance for the 2017 fiscal year.

What did Revelstoke’s elected officials get paid in 2017?

Each year public bodies must submit a Statement of Financial Information to the Ministry of Finance detailing the remuneration paid to each elected employee.

The statement also details the corporations assets, liabilities, operational statement, schedule of debts and a schedule of guarantees and indemnity agreements.

In 2016-2017, the school board chair Bill MacFarlane was paid $9,395, the vice chair Alan Chell was paid $8,807, trustees Jeff Nicholson and Elmer Rorstad were paid $8,220, trustee Amanda Richardson was paid $2,055 and trustee Leslie Savage was paid $4,795.

However, school board pay is set to increase in 2019, following the upcoming municipal election.

Values were determined based on the average compensation amounts of the 14 smallest school districts in B.C. with consideration of the changes to the Income Tax Act which will make the compensation taxable.

The adjustments will bring the stipends up to $11,104 for trustees, $12,313 for the vice-chair and $13,595 for the chair to make the values the average of the other 13 districts.

READ MORE: Revelstoke school board pay set to increase in 2019

The statement also details which employees were paid more than $75,000. Superintendent Mike Hooker was paid the most at $146,871. In total there were 31 teachers in the Revelstoke School District were paid more than $75,000 a year.

Revelstoke City Councillors were paid $15,000 a year last year, plus expenses, the Mayor is paid $30,000 a year plus expenses. In total the city had 23 employees that make more than $75,000 a year. Michael Thomas, director of engineering and development services made the most.

For comparison, in Kimberley, B.C., which has a similar population to Revelstoke, as reported by the 2016 census, councillors were paid $13,720 in 2017 and the mayor was paid $27,441. In Kimberley there are 13 staff that make over $75,000 a year and the highest paid is Scott Sommerville, the chief administrative officer.

Trail also has a similar population to Revelstoke. In 2017 councillors were paid $15,857 and the mayor was paid $31,022. They have 29 staff paid more than $75,000 a year. The highest paid is David Perehudoff, the chief administrative officer and chief financial officer.

Another municipality with a similar population is Kitimat where councillors were paid $12,847 in 2017 and the mayor is paid $31,244. In Kitimat there are 75 employees paid more than $75,000 a year. The highest paid was Warren Waycheshen, the chief administrative officer.

Revelstoke area’s elected official on the Columbia Shuswap Regional District, director Loni Parker, was paid $24,045 last year and claimed $13,239 in expenses. The alternate director, Doug Stuart was paid $457 and claimed $395 in expenses.

*With files by Nathan Kunz

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