B.C. provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry takes questions at the B.C. legislature, April 29, 2020 (B.C. government)

EDITORIAL: Restrictions continue

COVID-19 directives will not be lifted all at once

Later this month, provincial officials here in British Columbia will begin launching the next plans for managing the COVID-19 pandemic.

Since the middle of March, we have been under some noticeable restrictions in order to slow the spread of this pandemic.

Gatherings of more than 50 people are prohibited, and physical distancing of two metres between people is required.

Numerous businesses have had to close their doors entirely or adapt to these restrictions.

For the rest of us, the changes have kept us from getting together with friends and relatives, attending concerts and events or participating in team sports.

READ ALSO: COVID-19: B.C. begins calling back scheduled surgery patients

READ ALSO: COVID-19: Business return up to managers, customers, Dr. Henry says

However, the efforts they have taken, as well as the response from the public, has meant the pandemic here in British Columbia has not affected us as hard as in other parts of the world.

For the most part, people have followed the directives and by doing so, have slowed the spread of the virus.

It may soon be time to ease up on the restrictions.

While many are eager to have more relaxed restrictions, it is important to remember that this process will happen gradually.

Things will not go back to pre-pandemic conditions immediately.

Instead, the changes will happen in phases.

Bonnie Henry, B.C.’s public health officer, has said large gatherings and festivals will not be happening this year.

Even weddings and funerals will be affected.

Henry has said organizers will need to look for other ways to hold these events, restricting the number of people who attend in person.

None of this has been easy, and some of the limitations will remain in place for some time to come.

But this won’t last forever.

In time, the restrictions will be loosened. They will come to an end.

Eventually, COVID-19 will be a footnote in our history.

For now, however, it is our present reality.

And during this time it is important to continue to follow the directives to slow the spread of this pandemic.

— Black Press

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

CoronavirusEditorials

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

QUIZ: A celebration of apples

September is the start of the apple harvest

Interior Health reports three additional COVID-19 cases in region

The number of cases in the region since the beginning of the pandemic are now at 492

COVID-19 minimizes Okanagan Regional Library budget increase

Library adapts to pandemic fiscal disruptions

Interior Health continues to tackle COVID-19

IH president Susan Brown says don’t become complacent about pandemic

Conservative opposition critic tours through Kootenay riding on listening tour

Pierre Poilievre, the Tory finance critic, gathering local feedback on pandemic supports, recovery issues

3 new deaths due to COVID-19 in B.C., 139 new cases

B.C. confirms 40 ‘historic cases,’ as well

Stranger in truck grabs boy walking home from school in Kelowna

The 11-year-old boy escaped the incident, RCMP are investigating

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

The court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington

‘This is a very difficult sentencing’; Judge delays Okanagan manslaughter trial to next week

The courts heard Friday that Bourque “did not intend to cause harm” but that her actions were “reckless”

Emaciated grizzly found dead on central B.C. coast as low salmon count sparks concern

Grizzly was found on Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw territory in Smith Inlet, 60K north of Port Hardy

VIDEO: B.C. to launch mouth-rinse COVID-19 test for kids

Test involves swishing and gargling saline in mouth and no deep-nasal swab

Young Canadians have curtailed vaping during pandemic, survey finds

The survey funded by Heart & Stroke also found the decrease in vaping frequency is most notable in British Columbia and Ontario

B.C. teachers file Labour Relations Board application over COVID-19 classroom concerns

The application comes as B.C.’s second week of the new school year comes to a close

CHARTS: Beyond Metro Vancouver, COVID-19 cases in B.C. haven’t increased much recently

COVID-19 case counts outside of Metro Vancouver have been level since July

Most Read