Jocelyn’s Jottings: Finding the middle ground

Life and issues are complicated.

I’ve had at least two “where is the middle ground” moments in the last week.

The first was with the students protesting. I think that kids engaging with current events and politics is important for their growth as well as our future.

RELATED: Revelstoke student speak volumes through 2018 Vow of Silence

However one commentor on our Facebook page said that kids have no place in those conversations, and it should be left to the adults.

Though I don’t agree with how extreme her ideas were, it got me thinking about media exposure versus the need for kids to just be worry free and have fun.

When I was young I cried myself to sleep a few times thinking about the kids that were starving in Africa.

Now, that wasn’t very productive, I just went to school the next day exhausted. But would it have been better if I just hadn’t known?

Probably not.

I think the keys here are balance and action. I think people should know about the bad things that go on in the world.

Otherwise I wouldn’t be doing the job I am doing. But there has to be balance. I want to read about resilient people as well as the tragedies.

In telling me that there are children starving on the other side of the world, they should have also told me that there are organizations working to fix the problem.

I think what Flying Arrow Productions is doing with the AB project hits that middle ground. The young people are learning details of the horrific terrorist attack in Norway that saw 69 youth shot by Andres Breivik, but they are exploring their feelings through movement and sharing that conversation through theatre.

RELATED: Revelstoke youth participate in international AB theatre project

My second “where is the middle ground” moment was while I was writing about the caribou protection plan.

READ MORE: City of Revelstoke concerned with policy proposed for the Provincial Caribou Recovery Program

I’m in favour of protecting wild animals and the environment, but I am also in favour of economic growth and development in the area.

There has to be a balance.

Luckily it isn’t just habitat protection that will save the caribou. According to a scientist from the University of Alberta that did a presentation to city council a few weeks ago if all we do is protect habitat the caribou will still go extinct. Predators and prey have to be managed and other methods such as feeding and penning will also be tried out.

At the end of the day it seems like having a black and white view of the world doesn’t work well. Children need to have the space to be silly and innocent but they also need to learn the truths of the world and what they can do.

Caribou need to be protected and people need to be able to make a living and build a business.

Looking at the middle ground is just so complicated.


 

@JDoll_Revy
jocelyn.doll@revelstokereview.com

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