A female wolf, left, and male wolf roam the tundra near The Meadowbank Gold Mine located in the Nunavut Territory of Canada on Wednesday, March 25, 2009. A British Columbia environmental group has launched a legal petition alleging the provincial government’s wolf cull to save caribou is breaking federal and provincial laws. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)

A female wolf, left, and male wolf roam the tundra near The Meadowbank Gold Mine located in the Nunavut Territory of Canada on Wednesday, March 25, 2009. A British Columbia environmental group has launched a legal petition alleging the provincial government’s wolf cull to save caribou is breaking federal and provincial laws. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)

Letter: Hey toque n’ dog lovin’ community they’re going to kill more canines

The province is spending $500,000 to pay for the fifth winter of wolf removal

Editor,

Can you look your dear dog in the eyes and think of your tax dollars spent on more wolf killings?

Wouldn’t you be appalled if you saw the gruesome death of your dog; think wolf.

The Revelstoke Review article of August 27 informs us that $500,000 of the province caribou protection budget is to pay for a 5th winter of wolf removal.

The article also alludes to a study published in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation which “found flaws in a 2019 report that the province relied on while expanding its wolf culling program. The study by researchers from Raincoast Conservation and the universities of Alberta, British Columbia and Victoria found killing wolves has had “no detectable effect” on reversing the decline of endangered caribou populations”.

READ MORE: Statistical flaws led to B.C. wolf cull which didn’t save endangered caribou as estimated

Habitat changes and intrusions have made fragile caribou groups more vulnerable to predators. Wolves have become the scapegoat in the dilemma of declining caribou. Wolves are crucial to sustaining a balanced ecosystem and maintain the health and integrity of wild herds by eliminating weaker sickly members which ultimately strengthens the herd. Wolves are also the clean up crew so a wolf track filmed in juxtaposition to a caribou carcass doesn’t mean they are the culprit.

In the 1920s wolves disappeared from the world’s first national park, Yellowstone Park, US with dire consequences. Wolves have since been reintroduced, restoring stability.

Taking wolves out of the equation also increases deer population and has led to them wandering in rural yards and gardens and in urban neighbourhoods. I’ve had some big ones visit my backyard and I’ve observed them throughout our community.

This will be the fifth year of killing hundreds of wolves at $500,000 per year for a total of 2.5 million dollars.

On a positive note to see some absolutely amazing wolves in action visit Revelstoke Visual Art Centre exhibit by Zuzanna Riha.

Jacquie Palmer, Revelstoke


 

@RevelstokeRevue
editor@revelstoketimesreview.com

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Letter to the Editor

 

Cartoon, wolf cull, Jacquie Palmer. Nov. 12, 2020. (Revelstoke Review)