LETTER: Let the Flats be enjoyed by all, motorized included

Motorized recreation shouldn't be banned on the Flats, write Olympe and Joan Astra

Editor,

Re: NCES asks for ban on motorized recreation on Columbia River Flats in the May 20 issue of the Review.

In checking with BC Hydro’s rules of conduct, posted on their signs at the entries to the Flats, we note that they are reasonable, namely:

— No fires

— No camping

— No littering of dumping of any material

— Use existing routes

— Respect private property and rights

Nowhere do we see restriction on motorized vehicles.

It seems that the “environmental damage” isn’t in stirring up mud (as in mud bogging), but in trash being constantly dumped on the edges of the reservoir. When the reservoir fills, the trash floats and impedes water sports.

When a few machines got stuck in the mud, there was an accidental loss of some oil. There usually is some loss of oil wherever machinery is used, namely: parking lots, filling stations, logging operations, railroads, etc… Most oils used these days are biodegradable, so the minimal loss during the course of a recreational outing is superfluous.

Unfortunately, newcomers to this valley fail to understand the history behind why the flats exist in the first place. In the 1960s, BC Hydro chose to expropriate the beautiful farms and flood the reservoir seasonally, causing fluctuation in the water levels. This has degraded the fish population that once enjoyed all the creeks flowing into the Columbia. It has also caused creeks such as Drimmie to change course constantly. To be concerned about a creek flowing through the floor of a reservoir when the water is down defies common sense because when the water level rises, it floods the whole area and changes the dynamics of the creek.

Mud is the result of a fluctuating water level in the reservoir where grass won’t grow anyway. The Flats are essentially a dead zone, as explained to us by a BC Hydro employee (except for the invasive grass planted by BC Hydro). Mud will heal in the next flood.

The airport deems water foul undesirable.

The question is: What is so sensitive about this habitat when the water level is so inconsistent as to prevent the formation of a true habitat for wildlife?

Leave the Flats to be enjoyed by young and old.

Sincerely,

Olympe and Joan Astra

Revelstoke

 

Just Posted

City of Revelstoke launches survey on communication

The results will be incorporated into the upcoming communication strategy

Portion of Highway 1 to be resurfaced east of Revelstoke this summer

Highway 1 will be resurfaced between Revelstoke Park East Gate and Glacier… Continue reading

Kinbasket Reservoir near record low levels last week

Earlier this month the Kinbasket Reservoir reached a low point of 714… Continue reading

Revelstoke Community Choir’s spring show coming up on Sunday

Join the choir and special guests on April 28 at the United Church

Okanagan city caps downtown cannabis retail applications

Four currently approved, two more coming, moratorium in place, reviewed after 12 months

Vancouver man, 19, charged in human trafficking case involving teen girl

The 16-year-old girl was reported missing and later discovered in Vancouver

Helevorn comes to Kelowna on first Canadian tour

The Spaniards will bring their brand of doom metal to Kelowna May 11

Summerland auxiliary raised $1M for hospital tower

Funds came from sales at Summerland Health Care Auxiliary Thrift Shop

Eagle’s nest receives reno after Chase grass fire

BC Hydro used to dealing with osprey nests, not so much with bald eagles

Amber alert issued for 5-year-old Ontario boy

Ethan Montes is believed to be in the company of his mother, 47-year-old Juliet Mohammed

One day cat cafe comes to Lake Country

The Lake Country Art Gallery will host the adoption event

Most Read