Liam’s Lowdown: There will always be those we don’t agree with

But they’re still part of Revelstoke. Whether we like it or not

Whenever I see someone’s career end due to a comment on television or social media, I think of Jon Ronson.

Jon Ronson is a Welsh journalist, known for his works that include The Men Who Stare at Goats and The Psychopath Test.

In 2015, he did a TED Talk entitled How One Tweet Can Ruin Your Life, which explored online shaming.

In his talk, Ronson focuses on an American named Justine Sacco.

In 2013, Sacco was boarding a plane to Africa and right before the plane took off, she tweeted “Going to Africa. Hope I don’t get AIDS. Just kidding. I’m white!”

Not surprisingly, that tweet didn’t land well. It soon became the number one worldwide trending topic on Twitter.

While she was in the air with her phone turned off, Twitter exploded.

She was called every derogatory name under the sun and the public demanded she be fired. Of course, her employer, IAC, a large American holding company, obliged. They usually do.

She was fired before the plane reached its destination.

The internet has given the voiceless a voice. In his talk, Ronson says when we perceive people to misuse their privilege or power, we can now “get them.”

Jon Ronson. (YouTube)

But what does that mean? There will always be people with whom we don’t agree with, who will say something not politically correct or that might even be hurtful to some.

Ronson tackles this question with saying social media is a mutual approval machine. When someone gets in the way, we scream them out, which is the opposite of a democracy.

People will always say something distasteful, but what matters is the conversation afterwards.

Even in Revelstoke, it can be surprising what people say.

I’ve gone to interview locals in cafes and later, I’ve had people from nearby tables or even cars stop in the street and tell me the person I was talking to was a degenerate.

It’s as if they thought, the “degenerate” shouldn’t have a voice. No matter the story.

Others have told me I shouldn’t interview so-and-so, because they married their friend for money or that person is crazy.

Some complain about our columnists, saying we should fire them, because they write something disagreeable, even though the purpose of a column is to start conversation.

If you’ve read something you don’t agree with — good. That’s life. That’s why we have the letter to the editor.

Although I haven’t been a journalist for long, I’ve learned everyone has a voice. Everyone.

It doesn’t matter if you’re a degenerate, gold digger, insane or unpopular.

You’re still part of Revelstoke. Whether we like it or not.

You might be surprised Revelstoke by what you hear on the street.

When I was standing outside the community centre on election day, asking voters about issues they think are important, I had some say they were voting to keep “the turban wearer out of politics,” except they said it with more profanity.

While it’s Black Press’s policy to not allow such speech on our platforms, I always wonder the cost of that.

As a newspaper, our job is to represent the voice of Revelstoke, but when that voice takes a left turn, we don’t.

Perhaps that’s why fringe politicians get elected, they say things people think but don’t say. Or at least, we don’t hear about.

As mentioned, there will always be people we don’t agree with, that will even say something racist or hurtful.

And for everyone that says it publicly, thousands more think it privately.

Firing someone doesn’t make the thoughts go away. You just hear them less and it can give a false impression.

We won’t know, as Hamlet once said, that “something is rotten in the state of Denmark.”

With no voice there is no dialogue, and with no dialogue nothing changes.


 

@pointypeak701
liam.harrap@revelstokereview.com

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