Opinion

(Nature Conservancy of Canada photo)

World Wetlands Day: Nature needs us to do more

Canada’s largest land conservation organization says there has never been a more important time for nature conservation

  • Feb 4, 2022
(Nature Conservancy of Canada photo)
Only about half of Grade 10 students in B.C. completed the latest “mandatory” student assessments, which revealed worryingly low levels of proficiency in literacy and numeracy. (Pixabay.com)

FRASER INSTITUTE: 60% of Grade 10 students in B.C. not proficient in math

‘Simply put, to know how to improve, you must know how you’re doing’

  • Feb 1, 2022
Only about half of Grade 10 students in B.C. completed the latest “mandatory” student assessments, which revealed worryingly low levels of proficiency in literacy and numeracy. (Pixabay.com)
Lantern decorations are hung on trees on the Olympic Green near the Olympic Tower at the 2022 Winter Olympics, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022, in Beijing. Millions of people in China and beyond are celebrating the Lunar New Year holiday on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

CAMERON: Is it time to get tough with China?

When the torch is lit in Beijing National Stadium February 4, marking…

  • Feb 1, 2022
Lantern decorations are hung on trees on the Olympic Green near the Olympic Tower at the 2022 Winter Olympics, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022, in Beijing. Millions of people in China and beyond are celebrating the Lunar New Year holiday on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
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A call for kindness

EDITORIAL: Sadly, there is a lot of hate going around in these dark COVID-exhausted days

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Wild Sky Sisters

Wild Sky Sisters: Aquarius Season, what is your social support network?

Wild Sky Sisters is a joint venture between Angela Moffitt and Tamara McLellan

  • Jan 21, 2022
Wild Sky Sisters
According to University of Toronto Global Journalism Fellow Anthony Fong, sexually aggressive online behaviours, affects 88 per cent of all Canadian university undergraduate women. THE CANADIAN PRESS

FONG: Legal reform needed to protect young women from growing online sexual violence

Liberals promised to rework online harms legislation within 100 days of Parliament’s Nov. 22 return

According to University of Toronto Global Journalism Fellow Anthony Fong, sexually aggressive online behaviours, affects 88 per cent of all Canadian university undergraduate women. THE CANADIAN PRESS
A Jell-O salad was once seen at many potlucks. Today, it is not as common. Other foods, including liver and onions, are also losing their former popularity. (Wikimedia Commons)

COLUMN: In search of Jell-O salad, old music and vintage clothing

The world has changed considerably in recent decades

A Jell-O salad was once seen at many potlucks. Today, it is not as common. Other foods, including liver and onions, are also losing their former popularity. (Wikimedia Commons)
Mimi Kramer spent the last 4 months completing her work experience program with the Revelstoke Review. (Josh Piercey/Revelstoke Review)

Goodbye Mimi: Work experience student completes time with the Review

Mimi Kramer joined the Review through the work experience program at Revelstoke Secondary School

Mimi Kramer spent the last 4 months completing her work experience program with the Revelstoke Review. (Josh Piercey/Revelstoke Review)
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EDITORIAL: Pandemic impact goes beyond numbers

Some jurisdictions, including British Columbia, have changed their testing policies

  • Jan 19, 2022
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FILE – Smoke rises from the Babine Forest Products mill in Burns Lake, B.C. Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

BAINS: Worker protections remain key 10 years after fatal northern B.C. sawmill explosions

Four workers died in two separate explosions at sawmills near Burns Lake and Prince George in 2012

  • Jan 19, 2022
FILE – Smoke rises from the Babine Forest Products mill in Burns Lake, B.C. Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way we grieve. (File photo)

Hay: We can’t let the pandemic put grief on hold

‘I have learned the difference between fear and hope is focus’

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way we grieve. (File photo)
There is no shortage of reading material as traditional publishers, small publishing houses, self-publishing and other options allow authors to express their views. (File Photo)

COLUMN: The freedom to make one’s voice heard

Plenty of options mean unpopular views need not be silenced

There is no shortage of reading material as traditional publishers, small publishing houses, self-publishing and other options allow authors to express their views. (File Photo)
The Barclay House on Victoria Road South in Summerland is the oldest continuously inhabited home in Summerland. This year, homes across the province saw a dramatic increase in their assessment values. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

EDITORIAL: The impact of rising assessment values

Higher housing assessment figures do not necessarily mean a corresponding tax increase

  • Jan 13, 2022
The Barclay House on Victoria Road South in Summerland is the oldest continuously inhabited home in Summerland. This year, homes across the province saw a dramatic increase in their assessment values. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
Fraser Health registered nurse Kai Kayibadi draws a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine into a syringe at a walk-up vaccination clinic at Bear Creek Park, in Surrey, B.C., on Monday, May 17, 2021. The deadline for British Columbia health care workers to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 is today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Looking ahead to upheaval in 2022: The great reset in B.C.

By Bruce Cameron Decades ago, Bob Dylan sang, “You don’t need a…

  • Jan 10, 2022
Fraser Health registered nurse Kai Kayibadi draws a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine into a syringe at a walk-up vaccination clinic at Bear Creek Park, in Surrey, B.C., on Monday, May 17, 2021. The deadline for British Columbia health care workers to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 is today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Brian Mark, co-owner of Iron Energy Gym in West Kelowna has been publicly defying the health order and refuses to close. (@therealbrianmark/Instagram)

OPINION: Gym owners defying health orders are in the wrong

A vast majority of gyms in B.C. have complied with public health orders and continue to do so

Brian Mark, co-owner of Iron Energy Gym in West Kelowna has been publicly defying the health order and refuses to close. (@therealbrianmark/Instagram)
A Great Blue Heron takes time out for some people-watching at the Salmon Arm Wharf in October 2021. (Photo by John G. Woods)

COLUMN: Appreciating bird-watching bounty of Salmon Arm Bay

Birdwatchers come from B.C. and beyond to see and hear the inhabitants of the foreshore

  • Jan 3, 2022
A Great Blue Heron takes time out for some people-watching at the Salmon Arm Wharf in October 2021. (Photo by John G. Woods)
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Piercey’s Playbook: Resolving your resolutions

How can we keep the resolutions we make next year?

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The view from about halfway down Silver Star Mountain Resort’s “Far Out” green run. (Zachary Roman/Eagle Valley News)

Column: New year, same old me

The Roman Report by Zachary Roman

The view from about halfway down Silver Star Mountain Resort’s “Far Out” green run. (Zachary Roman/Eagle Valley News)
This is the time to choose the world we want after the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is behind us. (Pixabay.com)

COLUMN: Planning for a post-pandemic future

The world after COVID-19 will not be the same as it was before

This is the time to choose the world we want after the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is behind us. (Pixabay.com)
A Christmas cared from Richard ‘Dick’ Palmer and his wife Marjorie shows their home at the Summerland Research Station. Dick Palmer was the superintendent at the station from 1932 to 1953. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

COLUMN: A too-perfect scene during the festive season

The description of a picture-perfect family setting might have been flawed

A Christmas cared from Richard ‘Dick’ Palmer and his wife Marjorie shows their home at the Summerland Research Station. Dick Palmer was the superintendent at the station from 1932 to 1953. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)