The Revelstoke Golf Club restaurant is in the middle of renovations and upgrades. Pictured here are Revelstoke Golf Club executive members Heather Duchman

Revelstoke Golf Club drives for long-range plan

Following controversial report, executive explains plans to repair, reform and revitalize Revelstoke Golf Club facility

It’s a brisk spring morning at the Revelstoke Golf Club. The last pockets of snow have nearly melted from the back nine – the club is hoping to open by April 17, weather depending.

Inside, tradesmen are busily repairing the clubhouse. A new floor is going into the kitchen. Many posts and beams have been replaced in the lounge and down in the basement, where the original wood fireplace resembles a giant stone pizza oven. The work follows city council approval of about $45,000 in funding from the Resort Municipality Initiative grant program.

Upstairs, the Revelstoke Golf Club executive huddles in the cold changing room – it’s a seasonal building.

After a recent high-profile report at city council pointing to deficiencies in the clubhouse and outbuildings totalling $600,000, they’re there to clarify what’s going on.

The change, explains president Dwayne Haaf, started last year when the executive was struggling with finance issues. The members had been hit with a controversial $150 assessment to deal with over-runs and ongoing expenses.

They decided to start fresh, and worked with consultants to run their operations in a more businesslike fashion. They’re developing a five-year plan for operations, a five-year business plan and a capital plan – something they’ve never done before.

Part of that plan was taking a look at the facilities, which they requested the city do – the buildings belong to the city. The result was a report that looked at everything that needs to be done to bring the aging buildings to code.

Haaf explained the club is a tenant at golf course; the city took over as owner many, many years ago. The golf club’s mission is to run the facility, and gain grants as a non-profit society.

“We’ve worked very hard to set up a long-term five-year strategic plan, we’re working on a five-year business plan, and now we’ve started to incorporate a five-year capital plan for the city, for our maintenance buildings, for the clubhouse,” Haaf said. “So that over the next five years, we’ll do a little bit here, a little bit there; we don’t want the city to foot a $600,000 bill – those were just recommendations by the engineering company.”

The executive fundamentally disagrees with the $600,000 price tag. They feel they can avoid about half the cost. Not all the outbuildings are needed, and some can be replaced more cheaply. Another recommendation is to bring the building up to four-season standards – to make it an all-year building. That’s something they’re not sure is necessary, but sure will be costly. “I’m positive it won’t be $600,000,” Haaf said, adding the club couldn’t put a figure on it yet. “The $600,000 was a recommendation by the engineering firm to replace everything we have and bring it all up to snuff in one big go.”

Vice-president Heather Duchman said volunteers have been actively involved in the ongoing work. “It’s important to know that there’s a huge commitment from the membership,” she said. “At the end of the day our focus is to have this golf course here for a long, long time – for many generations to come.”

Coun. Tony Scarcella is the council liaison for the golf club. He said the report to council was part of a process “to put everything on top of the table.” He said the golf course is a public recreation facility that brings in tourism, creates jobs and is needed in the community.

Haaf explains they’re trying to encourage membership. Back in 2008, the course had 370 members, bringing in $298,000. That’s down to 230 members drawing $200,000. A membership drive is one of their key goals. Haaf feels there’s a perception the golf club is an elitist establishment. It may have been years ago, but that’s long gone. It’s an open facility; you don’t have to be a member to play.

They’re driving to bring more youth golfers in. There’s an ongoing attempt to organize a high school team, and they’ve introduced new junior programs designed to bring young members in.

 

Just Posted

Revelstoke ladies make 2,200 cabbage rolls for charity

The money raised was donated to former NHL player Aaron Volpatti, who is raising funds for ALS

Revelstoke Golf Club open weeks early

The club didn’t open until May last year

Okanagan-Shuswap weather: Clear skies and pushing 20 C

Environement Canada forcasts a sunny and warm Easter weekend

Revelstoke roads and weather: mix of sun and cloud

Heavy rains have destabilized the snowpack. Be careful in the backcountry

Update: Fire destroys Peachland home on Somerset Avenue

Crews are still on scene pumping water onto the blaze

Waste not: Kootenay brewery leftovers feed the local food chain

Spent grains from the Trail Beer Refinery are donated to local farmers and growers, none go to waste

Summerland student examines effects of sound

Science fair project will go to national competition in New Brunswick

Cuteness overload: duckling thinks dog is its mom

Vernon photographer Fiona Hook shot a cute video after noticing one of her ducklings had taken a special liking to her dog.

Sons of Anarchy’s Kim Coates stops by Okanagan café

Coates was spotted in West Bank’s Kekuli Café on April 20

Deck collapses in Langley during celebration, 35 people injured

Emergency responders rushed to the Langley home

B.C. mom wages battle to get back four kids taken from her in Egypt

Sara Lessing of Mission has help from Abbotsford law firm

B.C. mountain biker sent home from hospital twice, despite broken vertebrae

Released in Maple Ridge to go home with three fractured vertebrae

Seven tips to travel safely this Easter long weekend

An average of three people are killed, and hundreds more injured, each Easter long weekend in B.C.

Most Read