Neill Wakefield, who appeared primarily on season five of the Discovery Channel TV show Highway Thru Hell, recently moved to Langford with his wife Tiffany. While working for Mission Towing, Wakefield spent over $25,000 personalizing his tow truck. (Photo courtesy of Neill Wakefield)

Neill Wakefield, who appeared primarily on season five of the Discovery Channel TV show Highway Thru Hell, recently moved to Langford with his wife Tiffany. While working for Mission Towing, Wakefield spent over $25,000 personalizing his tow truck. (Photo courtesy of Neill Wakefield)

Highway Thru Hell tow truck driver shifts gears, moves to Vancouver Island

Neill Wakefield is taking a break from business, and considering changing his line of work.

A star of the popular TV show Highway Thru Hell is travelling a new road this year.

Neill Wakefield, who appeared as one of the tow truck drivers on season five of the Discovery Channel show, recently moved to Langford on Vancouver Island with his family. His wife, Tiffany, is originally from the Island, and they moved back to live closer to her four kids.

The couple met through the towing industry on the mainland, and were married four years ago in Vegas.

“I’m still getting used to living on the Island,” chuckled Wakefield. “It’s a really beautiful place, but I am used to the big city, and being able to go anywhere at any time.”

Wakefield, originally from Brandon, Man., has moved numerous times in his life, primarily bouncing between Burnaby and Winnipeg. Throughout all the changes in scenery, his career in towing has been constant, taking his first job as a tow truck driver at 17.

READ ALSO: Old Highway Thru Hell tow truck helps move 850-tonne ship at Victoria shipyard

Days in the towing industry are long, tiresome, and at times, gruesome, but Wakefield has stayed with the work for 40 years.

“I’ve been addicted to towing I guess,” said Wakefield. “Hours are long, I’m on call pretty much seven days a week, so it’s more of a lifestyle, but I enjoy it.”

Wakefield was working for Mission Towing while featured on the Highway Thru Hell series, where he did heavy recovery work on Highways 1, 3, 7, 9, and Highway 5, also known as the Coquihalla. The tough job was recognized on the show, where Wakefield had to endure nasty weather conditions and dangerous situations in order to recover vehicles.

“Towing has to be in your blood to be good at it,” said Wakefield. “The pressure is on to get the job done without any problems, and every incident is different. There are quick decisions you have to make, and you have to work fast and efficiently because road closures are a big deal.”

The variety is what kept Wakefield interested in the work, but is also what has been the biggest challenge.

“You never know what you are getting,” said Wakefield. “One rollover could be easy, the next could be super complicated. You could be out in a blizzard, trudging through ditches or over cliffs, and people are relying on you to get it done quickly. I liked that the job was different every day, but it also added a lot of stress in my life.”

READ ALSO: Orcas spotted close to shore in Esquimalt

One of the episodes was focused around Wakefield and all the work he put in to personalizing his truck.

“I spent over $25,000 of my own money fixing up the company truck and making it nice. I wasn’t just a driver, I lived in my truck basically,” said Wakefield, who didn’t keep the vehicle after leaving his job with Mission Towing. “When I left the company I lost almost all of my money unfortunately. They gave me a little bit, but nothing compared to what I spent on it.”

Wakefield said he left Mission Towing after the company building burned down. He has worked in both the towing and long-hall businesses since leaving Mission Towing and the TV show. Since moving to Langford, he and Tiffany have both been working for West Shore Towing. However, Wakefield is currently taking a break from business, and is considering changing his line of work.

“I’m hoping to get a job with more regularity, something more laid back,” said Wakefield. “It may be time for me to be done with towing for good. It’s hard work, and it’s a younger man’s game.”

For more news from Vancouver Island and beyond delivered daily into your inbox, please click here.


Do you have a story tip? Email: vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and like us on Facebook.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Neill Wakefield, who appeared primarily on season five of the Discovery Channel TV show Highway Thru Hell, recently moved to Langford with his wife Tiffany. The couple, who met through the towing industry and married four years ago, wanted to settle here to live closer to family. (Photo courtesy of Neill Wakefield)

Neill Wakefield, who appeared primarily on season five of the Discovery Channel TV show Highway Thru Hell, recently moved to Langford with his wife Tiffany. The couple, who met through the towing industry and married four years ago, wanted to settle here to live closer to family. (Photo courtesy of Neill Wakefield)

Neill Wakefield, who appeared primarily on season five of the Discovery Channel TV show Highway Thru Hell, recently moved to Langford with his wife Tiffany. Wakefield has worked in the towing industry for 40 years, and said each vehicle recovery presents a different set of challenges. (Photo courtesy of Neill Wakefield)

Neill Wakefield, who appeared primarily on season five of the Discovery Channel TV show Highway Thru Hell, recently moved to Langford with his wife Tiffany. Wakefield has worked in the towing industry for 40 years, and said each vehicle recovery presents a different set of challenges. (Photo courtesy of Neill Wakefield)

Neill Wakefield, who appeared primarily on season five of the Discovery Channel TV show Highway Thru Hell, recently moved to Langford with his wife Tiffany. Wakefield has worked in the towing industry for 40 years, and said each vehicle recovery presents a different set of challenges. (Photo courtesy of Neill Wakefield)

Neill Wakefield, who appeared primarily on season five of the Discovery Channel TV show Highway Thru Hell, recently moved to Langford with his wife Tiffany. Wakefield has worked in the towing industry for 40 years, and said each vehicle recovery presents a different set of challenges. (Photo courtesy of Neill Wakefield)

Just Posted

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson outlines the province’s three-year budget in Victoria, April 20, 2021. (B.C. government video)
B.C. deficit to grow by $19 billion for COVID-19 recovery spending

Pandemic-year deficit $5 billion lower than forecast

A syringe is loaded with COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
67 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health

Thirty people in the region are hospitalized with the virus, 11 of whom are intensive care

Kootenay-Columbia MP Rob Morrison. Photo courtesy Conservative Party of Canada.
Kootenay-Columbia MP pans federal budget

Conservative Rob Morrison says budget doesn’t have a plan for long-term spending priorities

A view of the Jordan River from the trail in the area, during the summer. There are two new gravel pits up for consideration by the province. The area is deemed to be ecologically sensitive. (Jocelyn Doll/Revelstoke Review)
LETTER: When did Revelstoke become gravel pit central?

Two new gravel pits are being proposed near the Jordan River

Photo: pixabay.com
Morning Start: Why do dogs like squeaky toys?

Your morning start for Tuesday, April 20, 2021

FILE – NDP Leader John Horgan, right, and local candidate Mike Farnworth greet one another with an elbow bump during a campaign stop in Coquitlam, B.C., on Friday, September 25, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. won’t be using random individual road stops to enforce travel rules: Safety Minister

Minister Mike Farnworth says travel checks only being considered at major highway junctions, ferry ports

A man pauses at a coffin after carrying it during a memorial march to remember victims of overdose deaths in Vancouver. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. announces historic half-billion-dollar funding for overdose crisis, mental health

Of it, $152 million will be used to address the opioid crisis and see the creation of 195 new substance use treatment beds

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Children’s backpacks and shoes are seen at a CEFA (Core Education and Fine Arts) Early Learning daycare franchise, in Langley, B.C., on Tuesday May 29, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. budget to expand $10-a-day child care, but misses the mark on ‘truly universal’ system

$111 million will be used to fund 3,750 new $10-a-day spaces though 75 additional ChildCareBC universal prototype sites over the next three years.

Kate Budau’s flat tire outside of Glenmore Elementary School on Monday. (Contributed)
Kelowna mom searches for Good Samaritans who helped her change a tire

Woman looking for two dads who helped her after her tire popped in the Glenmore Elementary School drop-off area on Monday

John Wekking, Merritt Road Report - Facebook
 Coquihalla Road Report
Wildfire sparks off Coquihalla in Merritt

The wildfire is located near the Dollarama off of Highway 5

Mak Parhar speaks at an anti-mask rally outside the Vancouver Art Gallery on Sunday, Nov. 1, 2020. Parhar was arrested on Nov. 2 and charged with allegedly violating the Quarantine Act after returning from a Flat Earth conference held in Geenville, South Carolina on Oct. 24. (Flat Earth Focker/YouTube.com screenshot)
Judge tosses lawsuit of B.C. COVID-denier who broke quarantine after Flat Earth conference

Mak Parhar accused gov, police of trespass, malfeasance, extortion, terrorism, kidnapping and fraud

Most Read