(Natalia Cuevas-Huaico - Kelowna Capital News)

Morning start: Why does your phone die so fast in the cold?

Your morning start: Fun fact, weather, and video of the day

We’ve all been there, you’re standing outside and looking at your phone, you glance at your battery level and it seems fine. A few minutes later you look again and it’s nearly drained. You voice your frustration to the frigid air and curse your phone’s manufacturer for doing such a shoddy job – but it may not be their fault.

Fun Fact of the day:

The reason your phone seems to hate the cold is a problem shared not only by your phone’s battery but batteries everywhere. Essentially batteries are an ongoing chemical reaction where negatively charged electrons are passed through a wire to meet up with positively charged molecules on the other side. This movement is what generates current and is exactly where temperature comes into play. At a molecular level, heat is movement. Take away the heat and there is less movement, or so your phone thinks. Your battery may be fully charged but in the cold your phone is detecting less movement, so your phone thinks thinks there is less current and determines your battery is low despite it having a nearly full charge.

But how to prevent it? There are a few options. The quickest, easiest and cheapest option is to simply keep the phone in your pocket as much as possible. You can also turn on your phone’s power-saving mode and lastly you can buy a case designed to protect against cold weather.

Weather forecast according to Environment Canada:

Much of the Interior will see snowfall throughout Wednesday continuing into the evening and tapering off by Thursday. Further on in the week temperatures are expected to climb from -13 C to 2 C in some areas.

In Kelowna:

In Vernon:

In Penticton:

In Salmon Arm:

In case you missed it (ICYMI):

Premier John Horgan says he is excited by the prospect of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle calling British Columbia their part-time home. What do you think?

Video of the day:

Check out this singing road in Kyoto, Japan! These musical roads use grooves made from a pattern of steel bars so that when a vehicle passes over that strip at a specific speed, different pitches are produced depending on the frequency of the grooves.

View this post on Instagram

Musical Road Lines.🎶(wanna travel?) • Musical roads are based on the concept that vibrating objects produce sound. Grooves are made on the road in a pattern using steel bars so that when a vehicle passes over that strip at a specific speed , music is produced. The work requires great precision as the spacing between the notes can be as small as 5mm. • Follow : @sci.videos for More! 🌈✨ • If you like this post then must check my other posts too ! • Share with your friends ! Tag your friends? • #engineering #road #sciencenerd #soundsgood #music #waitforit #sciences #sciencebitch #sciencenews #scienceart #sciencerules #satisfying #science #japantravel #sciencerocks #sciencefun #roadtrip #sciencefair #japan #travelgram

A post shared by Science Videos™ (@sci.videos) on

Read more: Sledding injures tens of thousands of children each year

Read more: Okanagan bear “on a walkabout,” expected to return home


@CameronJHT
Cameron.thomson@saobserver.net

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