Moving the old jail from Third Street West to Carlson Street in May 1971. (Estelle Dickey photo; Revelstoke Museum and Archives photo 9171)

Moving the old jail from Third Street West to Carlson Street in May 1971. (Estelle Dickey photo; Revelstoke Museum and Archives photo 9171)

Glimpses of Revelstoke’s past for May 13

Local history as recorded by the newspaper of the day

130 years ago: Kootenay Star, May 16, 1891

The paper reported that a group of Indigenous people arrived in town from a hunting expedition. They brought with them a number of bear and beaver pelts. The note did not indicate where they had come from, or what First Nation they belonged to.

120 years ago: Revelstoke Herald, May 11, 1901

Mayor Thomas Kilpatrick resigned from his position, as he had just been named Acting Superintendent of the Mountain and Shuswap Division of the Canadian Pacific Railway. He did not feel that he could adequately fill both roles.

110 years ago: Mail-Herald, May 10, 1911

Plans for the new Provincial Court House arrived in the city and were on view at the old Court House. The newspaper reported: “That Revelstoke will have one of the most up-to-date, commodious and architecturally beautiful public buildings in the Interior is patent to anybody viewing these plans.

100 years ago: Revelstoke Review, May 12, 1921

Miss Verna Felton and the Allen Players were scheduled to appear at the Empress Theatre for a week’s run. The program was to feature plays and musical numbers. The Allen Players had made several previous visits to Revelstoke and were well-known here. Verna Felton later had a Hollywood career as a character actor and voice actor, providing the voice for Dumbo’s mother in the Disney animated film Dumbo, the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland and many others.

90 years ago: Revelstoke Review, May 15, 1931

Many of Revelstoke’s prominent businessmen rolled up their shirt sleeves and put in a hard day of work at Williamson’s Lake, hauling sand and fill for the bank and beach at the lake. The Revelstoke Rotary Club took on improvements at the lake as their community project in 1930 and continued to maintain the lake for decades.

80 years ago: Revelstoke Review, May 15, 1941

Revelstoke Board of Trade started an interesting tourism promotion called “Write-a-Letter Week.” School children and adult residents were asked to write letters to their friends and relatives in the United States inviting them to visit Revelstoke this summer. Tourism brochures were provided to include with the letters, along with a sticker with a photo of Silver Tip Falls on the Big Bend Highway.

70 years ago: Revelstoke Review, May 10, 1951

A Holstein cow belonging to Mrs. E. Schumacher of Sidmouth had her third pair of twin calves. The cow had twins in 1940, 1950, and 1951 – a bull and a heifer each time.

60 years ago: Revelstoke Review, May 11, 1961

The Big Bend Highway was to open for the summer on May 15th. The highway, completed in 1940, did not remain open during the winter months.

50 years ago: Revelstoke Review, May 13, 1971

The former city jail was moved from its original location at Third Street West and Boyle Avenue to make way for the new federal building, which was to house the Post Office and Parks Canada. The jail building was moved to Carlson Street where it still stands as an apartment house.

40 years ago: Revelstoke Review, May 13, 1981

Downie Street Sawmills was convicted of damaging salmon spawning grounds on the Eagle River and was assessed a fine of $7,500. They were also ordered to implement an employee training program to avoid future incidents.

30 years ago: Revelstoke Times, May 15, 1991

A “People of the 90s” feature profiled Fran Jenkins, a local artist and prospector. Jenkins was known for her stone sculptures of animals, and with fellow artist Bill Cameron, designed the life-sized bronze grizzly statues at the entrance to Grizzly Plaza. Jenkins’ work was collected world-wide and appeared in galleries in Vancouver and Calgary.


 

@RevelstokeRevue
editor@revelstoketimesreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Local History