PHOTOS: Revelstoke in full bloom

Tiger lily. By Alanna McKay Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewTiger lily. By Alanna McKay Submitted to Revelstoke Review
By Ariane Arbour Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewBy Ariane Arbour Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Monotropa uniflora also known as a ghost plant, Indian pipe or corpse plant. By Brittany Duke Submitted to Revelstoke Review                                Monotropa uniflora also known as a ghost plant, Indian pipe or corpse plant. By Brittany Duke Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewMonotropa uniflora also known as a ghost plant, Indian pipe or corpse plant. By Brittany Duke Submitted to Revelstoke Review Monotropa uniflora also known as a ghost plant, Indian pipe or corpse plant. By Brittany Duke Submitted to Revelstoke Review
A white pasque flower or western pasque flower, the flower of a western anemone. By Trevor Butcher Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewA white pasque flower or western pasque flower, the flower of a western anemone. By Trevor Butcher Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Pink mountain heather. By Cailin English Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewPink mountain heather. By Cailin English Submitted to Revelstoke Review
By Christina Laforge Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewBy Christina Laforge Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Indian paintbrush. By Cory Yeatman Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewIndian paintbrush. By Cory Yeatman Submitted to Revelstoke Review
By Courtny Nef Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewBy Courtny Nef Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Rhododendron. By David Pendergast Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewRhododendron. By David Pendergast Submitted to Revelstoke Review
By Jill Remus Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewBy Jill Remus Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Aster. By John Madden Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewAster. By John Madden Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Indian paintbrushes. By Lucie Bergeron Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewIndian paintbrushes. By Lucie Bergeron Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Dwarf fireweed or river beauty willowherb. By Lynda McLellan Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewDwarf fireweed or river beauty willowherb. By Lynda McLellan Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Columbine. By Mindy Brugman Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewColumbine. By Mindy Brugman Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Monkeyflower. By Mindy Brugman Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewMonkeyflower. By Mindy Brugman Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Alaska bellheather or Alaska moss heather. By Mindy Brugman Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewAlaska bellheather or Alaska moss heather. By Mindy Brugman Submitted to Revelstoke Review
By Paige Ra Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewBy Paige Ra Submitted to Revelstoke Review
By Sayge Fish Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewBy Sayge Fish Submitted to Revelstoke Review
By Sayge Fish Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewBy Sayge Fish Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Tiger lily. By Shawn Filipchuck Powell Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewTiger lily. By Shawn Filipchuck Powell Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Western anemone. By Terry Deyl Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewWestern anemone. By Terry Deyl Submitted to Revelstoke Review
By Todd Fifield Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewBy Todd Fifield Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Monotropa uniflora also known as a ghost plant, Indian pipe or corpse plant. By Zofie Humphreys Submitted to Revelstoke ReviewMonotropa uniflora also known as a ghost plant, Indian pipe or corpse plant. By Zofie Humphreys Submitted to Revelstoke Review
Phacelia sericea (Silky Phacelia or Blue alpine). Endemic to Western North America, this perennial grows among the subalpine to alpine elevations in open, rocky or sandy slopes. As a hyperaccumulator, it is able to grow in soils with high concentrations of heavy metals, which its roots absorb and store in extremely high concentrations in the tissues. Specifically, Silky Phacelia hyperaccumulates gold. (Photo by Emily Smith)                                Phacelia sericea (Silky Phacelia or Blue alpine). (Photo by Emily Smith/Submitted to Revelstoke Review)Phacelia sericea (Silky Phacelia or Blue alpine). Endemic to Western North America, this perennial grows among the subalpine to alpine elevations in open, rocky or sandy slopes. As a hyperaccumulator, it is able to grow in soils with high concentrations of heavy metals, which its roots absorb and store in extremely high concentrations in the tissues. Specifically, Silky Phacelia hyperaccumulates gold. (Photo by Emily Smith) Phacelia sericea (Silky Phacelia or Blue alpine). (Photo by Emily Smith/Submitted to Revelstoke Review)

Last week Revelstoke celebrated the beautiful colours popping up in the area with a Wildflower Festival.

We asked our readers to submit their best photos to us and with the help of the Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society weeded out the photos that featured invasive species.

We also attempted to identify the flowers, some we couldn’t. If you know what they are let us know in the comments below!

Thank you to our readers for sending in photos.


 

@RevelstokeRevue
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