Emergency services formed a mini parade in front of the Revelstoke hospital April 1 to support healthcare personal and frontline workers during the COVID-19 crisis. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

Emergency services formed a mini parade in front of the Revelstoke hospital April 1 to support healthcare personal and frontline workers during the COVID-19 crisis. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

Revelstoke makes noise for those impacted by COVID-19

The city would like to make it a nightly event

Revelstoke took to the streets last night to support a community heavily impacted by COVID-19.

At 7 p.m. on April 1, a mini parade of police cars, firetrucks and ambulances drove by Queen Victoria Hospital with flashing lights and sirens.

Nearby cars joined with honking horns and bystanders clapped.

Throughout the community, people banged pots or made what noise they could to support health care personal, front line essential workers and businesses who have closed their doors temporarily.

“In times like this, we need to rally together to show our support and appreciation for all the hard work and strength we have exhibited as a community,” said the City of Revelstoke in a statement.

The city asks the community to continue making a hullabaloo every night from 7 p.m. to 7:05 p.m.

“It’s time to make some noise for support, Revelstoke,” said the city.

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Communities across the country are adopting this tradition. For many hospitals, including Queen Victoria in Revelstoke, 7 p.m. coincides with a work shift change.

The show of support took place at 7 p.m. The city has called on the community to continue making noise each night from 7 p.m. to 7:05 p.m. as an act of solidarity. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

The tradition to applaud health-care workers during COVID-19v was reportedly started by Rory Richards in West Vancouver last month.

Apparently the first night she applauded from her window, her neighbours shut theirs.

Regardless, Richards kept messaging neighbours and friends, using social media to get the word out.

Eventually, the message took root and grew.


 

@pointypeak701
liam.harrap@revelstokereview.com

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